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New for Premium Members — Flush Hatches

One way to make scale RC airplanes look more realistic is to hide any and all of the switches and other RC-related hardware so that they aren’t visible from the outside. Hatches and flush fitting hatch covers are the answer. This how to article takes you step by step through the process of making a hinged, flush fitting and professional looking entryway for your model’s internal radio gear. To read more of this article as well as other exclusive online content, Click Here to subscribe to the Model Airplane News Members’ Only website. The post New for Premium Members — Flush Hatches appeared first on Model Airplane News.
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JShumate

JShumate

 

18-Foot Junkers Ju 188 Bomber

Finally, after seven years of building and planning this awesome giant scale WW2 German bomber took flight on October 6, 2018! Actually, one of three RC models being built at the same modeler’s club, this 1/4-scale Junkers Ju 188 was built and is owned by Franz Obenauf. The Ju 188 has an 18 foot span, weighs 187 pounds and is powered by two Moki 250cc 5-cylinder radial gas engines. The paint job and weathering has been expertly done by Klaus Herold. Video courtesy of RC Scale Airplanes MORE DETAILS Fuselage Length: 12½ ft. Height at canopy: 40.1 in. Landing Gear with Tires: 13.7 lbs. Retract System: Festo air cylinders 35mm diameter (1.8 in. Wheel Diameter 11.4 in. Propellers 30.7 in., 3-blade Ramoser   The post 18-Foot Junkers Ju 188 Bomber appeared first on Model Airplane News.
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JShumate

JShumate

 

Tips to Defeat Vibration

Often, RC modelers find that their servo output arms are coming loose during flight and for various reasons, this is not a good thing. Actually, servo arms coming loose is a symptom of something else that’s troubling your giant scale airplane and that’s Vibration. The majority of vibration comes from the engine and it affects other parts of your airframe. Here are a few tips to minimize the affects of engine vibration. First, make sure your engine is properly bolted in place and that the engine mounts (and its standoffs if used,) are secure.  Always use quality hardware and install wide flat washers under the nuts to spread out the load and help prevent the nuts from crushing into the firewall. Second, always run a properly balanced propeller. Whether you use a composite or wood prop, throw it on a balancer and make it doesn’t have a heavy blade. Use a quality balancer like the one from Du-Bro that has precision bearings and an adjustable base. Third, make sure your tail surfaces are properly installed and hinged and the linkage is free of slop. Sometimes a cheap CA style hinge will break and go unnoticed, so check these before each flight to be safe. I like to install jam nuts on the threaded ends of the pushrods to lock the clevises securely in place. It doesn’t take much to eliminate play in your linkages. And, fourth of course, make sure your servos are properly installed. Always use the rubber mounting grommets and be sure to install the brass inserts from the underside. This prevents the servo mounting screws from crushing the grommets. With most of my big planes, I like to install a removable servo tray made from a sheet of lite-ply. This makes inspection and maintenance a lot easier. I also glue additional layers of wood under the tray where the screws are inserted to stiffen the tray and to increase the amount of material the screws can thread into. Also, before you screw your servos into place, be sure to “harden” the threaded screw holes with a drop or two of thin CA. This will greatly reduce the chances of the screws stripping out of the wood. These issues usually affect your throttle, rudder and elevator servos. Engine vibration is most concentrated in the fuselage and it seldom affects the aileron and flap servos out in the wings. Another good tech tip for preventing the screws from backing out is to apply a very light smear of clear silicone sealant or Goop adhesive to the servo arm and the screw head. Just a little bit is all that’s needed. You don’t have to cover the entire screw. So, whenever you encounter a recurring problem, (especially after a rough landing or a crash,) look at your airplane as a whole and do everything you can to minimize the effects of engine vibration! Fly safe!   The post Tips to Defeat Vibration appeared first on Model Airplane News.
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JShumate

JShumate

 

Rest in Peace Herschel Worthy

It is with sadness that we learned that our friend and RC hobby personality, Herschel B. Worthy, age 82, passed away on Monday, October 15, 2018 in Memphis, Tennessee. Mr. Worthy was born April 17, 1936 to parents Herschel A. and Faith Worthy. Herschel was a resident of West Memphis. He was of the Baptist faith and attended the University of Arkansas. Herschel was an Army veteran. He spent many years working in the tire industry, 23 years with Firestone Tire, Cooper Tire and as a partner in Plaza Tire. He then relocated to California where he worked 4 years with Sky-Climber. Herschel, was however happiest serving his customers as Director of Sales and Marketing at Pacer Technology for over 30 years. Herschel leaves behind his daughter, Linda Worthy, four grandchildren; David and Jared Webb, Katie and Shelby Worthy along with four great-grandchildren. He is preceded in death by his parents and son Michael Worthy. We have many fond memories of seeing, and chatting with Herschel on the flightline at various RC events, and all of us here at Model Airplane News offer our sincere condolences to the Worthy family. The post Rest in Peace Herschel Worthy appeared first on Model Airplane News.
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JShumate

JShumate

 

Nail the Snap Roll

The snap roll is an advanced maneuver that you’ll first encounter in the IMAC Sportsman sequence. It evolves into more difficult variations in the upper classes of competition. It is one of the most difficult maneuvers in which to consistently achieve a high score because it requires a keen sense of timing, throttle management and exit correction. In addition, every plane seems to snap differently owing to its CG location and wing placement, i.e., low wing, mid wing, or high wing. If you want to achieve a good snap roll, practice is mandatory. The snap roll is an auto-rotation maneuver in a stalled condition. During a snap, one wing is stalled while the other is accelerated about the roll axis. This creates a sudden roll-rate acceleration that you can’t obtain by simply inputting aileron. To achieve this condition in a model, several inputs must be given, including elevator, rudder and aileron. Pilots of full-scale planes will scoff at the idea of adding aileron because it is not required when they deal with wing loading figures in the range of 35 pounds per square foot. Our models, however, typically carry a wing loading of from 20 to 40 ounces per square foot, so their flight dynamics are different from those of full-scale planes. FLYING THE MANEUVER
The simplest snap is known as the “inside snap.” This maneuver is performed from the upright position and is induced by adding elevator, rudder and aileron. Before you try this maneuver, be prepared for your plane to rotate at least twice as fast as it does during a typical aileron roll. You probably won’t even see your plane perform the maneuver because it happens so quickly. Instead, you will barely have started your control inputs when you’ll immediately have to think about recovery. Make sure that you have enough altitude to allow mistakes! Now take the airplane to a comfortable altitude at least 100 yards in front of you, parallel to the runway. Enter the aerobatic zone and fly to the center of the box at mid throttle (not full throttle). From level flight, perform an inside left snap by simultaneously applying up-elevator, left rudder and left aileron for 1 to 2 seconds. Recover from the maneuver by neutralizing the sticks and immediately adding right rudder to correct your loss of heading. Maintain the mid-throttle setting throughout the maneuver. FINESSING THE MANEUVER
There are several places where a little finesse will go a long way. Most pilots bury their sticks in the corners of their transmitters to snap their planes. This typically creates a stall in which too much energy is depleted, and recovery is very difficult. This condition is known as “snapping too deep.” Your goal is to fly through the maneuver with enough inertia to allow the airflow to re-attach to the stalled wing on demand. To accomplish this, you will need to decrease the elevator and/or rudder input until your plane just barely snaps. The only way to find this point is to practice it. When you find the perfect combination of elevator, rudder and aileron, practice it over and over until you can easily duplicate it. BY DAN WOLANSKI The post Nail the Snap Roll appeared first on Model Airplane News.
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JShumate

JShumate

 

Electric Retracts Made Easy

When you start to assemble an EDF jet, one of the required tasks is to work out and install your retractable landing gear. Modifying and installing E-flite gear in a jet is relatively simple and MAN contributor Ken Park recently accomplished the task for his new Viper Jet. Check it out, it’s easier than you may think. Before you can get in the air, you have to get your jet up on its landing gear. For many years I had shied away from models that required retracts because I thought they were too complicated, heavy and unreliable. Based on my observations of fellow club members spending half the day working on their gear, I took a pass.  Recently however, I have fallen in love with EDF jets and as my jets got bigger and bigger, my need for retractable gear has grown. Actually the hobby has forced me into finally biting the bullet and using them.  My first experience using traditional air-powered retracts with the necessary hardware and an air tank that needed to be pumped up, worked well but the onboard equipment took up a lot of room inside the model and the air lines and possible leaks was always a concern. So, for my newest project, the new Teng-Jet 90mm EDF Viper Jet (jet-teng.com), I decided to skip the air systems entirely and I went with the .25-.46-sized electric retracts from E-flite. From everyone I spoke with, the E-flite electric retracts came highly recommended, but also they recommended replacing the main gear’s trunions with more beefed up ones available from Tam Jets. The new trunions stand up nicely to the strain of rough flying fields conditions with models of higher wing loadings and electric ducted fan jets in general, always seem to fall into this category. Gear Upgrade Replacing the main trunions is as simple as putting each main gear into a vice on its side and removing the screws that hold both sides together.  You can then slip the Eflite trunion out and replace it with the Tam Jet one. Then you screw the case back together and you’re good to go. The standard E-flite wire struts and axles work very well but for a true “big Jet” look I switched them out with TamJet struts and axles. This is also a simple upgrade easily done by loosening the set screws and pulling off the strut’s retaining clip. Features The E-flite electric retracts come with a 3-way servo harness that allows you to attach together the two main gear and the nose wheel servo connectors so you the entire retract system operates from a single channel. A nice safety feature is that each time the receiver is powered up, you must flip the retract switch on/off on your radio to arm them. This eliminates the chances of the gear cycling unexpectedly should the switch be in the wrong position when you turn on your receiver.  Another nice feature of the nose wheel gear is the option to use either a tiller-arm or pull-pull method for steering.  The tiller-arm can be mounted on either side if need be. In most EDF jets you don’t have much room and the pull-pull method is your only option for steering.  The tiller-arm setup works nicely with my jet, and it provides a direct, slop-less link to the steering servo. Each of the three retract units simply screw down into place on the model using four mounting holes. Quick and simple.  To go the next step you can also add working gear-doors sequenced with the movement of retractable gear— way-cool and very easy! Functional gear doors The electronic brains for doing this job come simply by plugging in the “ASSAN Gear & Door Sequencer” (hobbyking.com). This little unit can handle two separate doors so, in my case with the Viper, the two main gear doors on the fuselage count as one door.  To do this I installed one servo to open both doors at the same time.  The other door sequence is used for the nose gear door. The Door Sequencer has three basic modes—F1, F2 and F3.  Once you decide on which mode is best for you, you’ll be able to fine tune each step by setting the servo travels and/or delay times required to make your mode work. The instructions so the breakdown for each mode, so it is pretty easy to get the sequences and time delays dialed in. First setup up your door throws using a regular servo tester (or your radio,) to get the linkage throws where you want them. Mark or measure the position of the linkage in the open and in the closed position. This doesn’t need to be super accurate, just approximate (for later use with the sequencer programming.) Then retract your gear and disconnect your door linkages. This is important; otherwise you could break something when you plug in the sequencer.
Now connect power to the sequencer (without the servos, or gear). It should start in the F1 mode. For my model with electric retracts F3 mode works best. To switch modes, press and hold FUNC+ and FUNC- for two seconds to advance to F2 mode, then press and hold again to advance to F3 mode. Next press and hold VOL+ and VOL- for to move into the programming mode. The number on the left corresponds to the function in the look up table, (see the manual under F3 mode.) Here you can change each setting of each function with FUNC+ and FUNC- used to move you through the functions. VOL+ and VOL- changes the value of the current function. Experiment with the programming until you are comfortable with the features. Then to exit programming mode and save your settings, press and hold VOL+ and VOL- again which them returns the sequencer to the F3 mode. Then power the unit down completely to save the chances, otherwise you’ll have to start all over. Now reconnect power and check to make sure the sequencer starts in F3 mode, then connect your door servos one at a time, (no linkages yet).
Fine Tuning In the F3 mode, DOOR 1 is for the nose gear and DOOR 2 is the main gear. Adjust the settings for each door first (using the measurements you took for the throws), then with the linkages connected, try them one at a time to fine tune. Once you are happy with the operation of the doors, disconnect the linkages again and open the doors fully. Now plug in the gear and the door servos (still no linkages) and adjust the gear and the door delays by noting when the gear/door servos move.
Once you’re happy, save your settings by pressing and holding VOL+ and VOL- again for two seconds and exit the programming mode. Now, try the whole thing again with the door linkages connected together. CAUTION—I strongly advise not going back into the program mode with both the doors and the gear plugged in, and the linkages connected. As you step through the functions you will end up with a door or gear out of sequence and this will damage something. Always unplug or disconnect either the door servos or the gear themselves if you want to fine tune a particular function again. Regardless of the sequencer’s settings, all the gear doors have to be hinged properly and work smoothly for everything to work in unison. Bottom line E-flite has really taken the trouble and effort out of using retractable landing gear and now anyone can look like a pro with the simple flip of a switch! Canada Install Servos Specifications: E-flite Electric Retracts (e-fliterc.com) Type:    25-46 Electric Tricycle Current draw—Idle: 5mA. Operating: 900mA (max). Pulse width trigger points—Down: 1.331ms; Up: 1.690ms. Operation—FM: 22ms frame rate, 5V signal; DSM: 20ms frame rate, 3.3V signal. Sequence time: @4.8V:            2.75sec @6.0V:            2.50sec @7.4V:            2.25sec Operating voltage range: 4.8—7.4V Aircraft weight: 5.00–9.50 lb (2.25–4.30 kg) Unit weight—Nose gear: 3.5 oz (99.5 g); Main gear: 2.8 oz (79.5 g) each Price: $169.99 Gear Used: Tamjets trunion upgrade kit for E-Flite 25-46 tricycle gear: $59.95 Struts and Axles: TK ASSAN Gear & Door Sequencer: $13.39         The post Electric Retracts Made Easy appeared first on Model Airplane News.
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JShumate

JShumate

 

Model Airplane News Celebrates its 90th Anniversary

Inspiring readers since 1929, Model Airplane News was there right at the beginning. It was 1929 and during the golden age of flying when the founder, George C. Johnson, launched the magazine. This era was one that inspired adventure. Higher, faster, farther—record-setting pilots with their radical new airplanes were the heroes for several generations of young people. And Model Airplane News was the information pipeline that helped bring so many people into the new field of model flight. According to CEO Louis DeFrancesco, “Very few magazine brands can boast this success and longevity. We are proud of our amazing history and talented team, and we will continue to drive the RC airplane market and excite new generations of enthusiasts into the 21st century.” Fast-forward 90 years and Model Airplane News has now grown into an iconic brand that continues to keep pace with modeling and media trends. A changing media landscape has given Model Airplane News the opportunity to engage readers with high-quality content anytime, anywhere through digital, social, and print channels. A leading enthusiast multimedia company producing the highest-quality content for the world’s most influential audiences, Air Age Media engaging more than six million monthly global consumers across digital, print, and video brands. Air Age has a portfolio that includes the most iconic titles in the RC, drone, flight history, and collector industries: RC Car Action, Model Airplane News, RotorDrone, Die Cast X, and Flight Journal. The company has developed its social media and digital/print platforms to nurture its audience with premium targeted content reaching the super-influential consumer. Here’s to another 90 years of RC Flight! The post Model Airplane News Celebrates its 90th Anniversary appeared first on Model Airplane News.
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JShumate

JShumate

 

Rage RC X-Fly VTOL

If you’re ready for a unique RC flying experience, the Rage X-Fly VTOL is the aircraft for you. In addition to typical 4-channel drone control, the X-Fly is capable of high alpha flight like an aircraft thanks to software that allows pilots to fly at either 20- or 35-degree angles of attack. It also includes features like one-touch takeoff and landing, altitude hold, and dual rates that allow you to fly with control speed that matches your skill level. Plus, the included LiPo battery provides plenty of power and flight times of over 5 minutes. The X-Fly not only has a futuristic design with bright, attractive graphics — it’s made of durable EPP foam and is equipped with powerful LEDs that provide great visibility, day or night. The X-Fly VTOL comes factory-assembled with a 2.4GHz 4-channel transmitter, a 250mAh 1-cell LiPo, and a convenient USB charger and spare propellers. Watch for a Flight Test in the February issue of MAN.   The post Rage RC X-Fly VTOL appeared first on Model Airplane News.
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JShumate

JShumate

 

First Flight P-40 Warhawk

Did you hear? The Curtiss P-40 Warhawk was first flown 80 years ago today on October 14, 1938! Wow! The XP-40 was flown in Buffalo, NY. Do you have an RC model of the P-40? let us know! The post First Flight P-40 Warhawk appeared first on Model Airplane News.
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JShumate

JShumate

 

MAN Plans: 25% Fokker E.V.

This 1/4-scale Fokker E.V., designed by David Johnson (plan no. X0305A), is a great project for anyone who wants a WW I fighter but doesn’t want the hassle of building two wings. Using conventional balsa, spruce and plywood construction, the Flying Razor has an 84 inch span and was designed for a Zenoah G-38 for power. The parasol wing is fully sheeted and it is built up-side down over the plans to make the dihedral and wingtip washout easy to do. The model uses Williams Brothers, scale vintage wheels and machine guns and the 1/4-scale Fokker cowl is available from Arizona Model Aircrafters. In the air the Fokker E.V. handles like an advanced trainer 3 sheets $27.95. Click HERE for plans. The post MAN Plans: 25% Fokker E.V. appeared first on Model Airplane News.
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JShumate

JShumate

 

Graupner HoTTigger V2

Graupner’s latest offering, the HoTTrigger 1400S V2 Competition Plug-and-Play (PNP), includes many performance and durability upgrades to the original high-performance aerobatic model. According to Graupner, the HoTTrigger combines the best attributes of the Extra 330SC and Edge 540 designs and incorporates a NACA 63A-mod airfoil for outstanding performance at any speed. Like its predecessor, it is a PNP model that only requires a receiver and LiPo battery. In the Air Field assembly only takes minutes: Slide the spar into the fuselage, insert the wing halves, and press the wing latches into place. No more wing bolts to lose! I felt that the recommended exponential values might result in an overly touchy model (aileron 17%, elevator 15%, and rudder 18% for 3D control throws). I increased these to 55% on all flight surfaces, and this proved to be a good starting point. I believe the recommended values are for use with a Graupner receiver with a flight-stabilization system. The relatively large wheels make taxiing and takeoff easy on grass or pavement. Takeoffs require only a small amount of rudder correction during the short roll. Landings are equally easy: Reduce power, line up with the runway, and flare. When balanced at the recommended center of gravity, the plane felt slightly on the tail-heavy side for my flying style; it had a slight tendency to climb when inverted. A larger-capacity battery should balance the plane to my liking. General Flight Performance Stability: Neutral stability, which the HoTTrigger possesses, is the name of the game in aerobatics. The plane retains its stability at all speeds and remains fully controllable at slow speeds. Tracking: From takeoff to landing, the tracking is superb. Knife-edge flight required virtually no corrections, and the plane held a perfect line. Aerobatics: Intermediate and sport pilots will enjoy putting the HoTTrigger through traditional aerobatic maneuvers. Rolls are axial and snaps are crisp, while loops can be as large as you want. There is ample power and control authority for any and all 3D maneuvers as well as extricating oneself from trouble. Vertical performance is fantastic for tall hammerheads or quickly gaining altitude for spinning maneuvers. While some planes excel in 3D but lack precision (and vice versa), the HoTTrigger is well balanced in this respect. Precision maneuvers, such as point rolls, look great, and the plane handles tumbling maneuvers with ease. Glide and stall performance: The HoTTrigger is controllable at very slow speeds without any tendency to drop a wing. Stalls are straight ahead, and recovery is quick. Bottom Line
After the first flight of the HoTTrigger, I decided it would be my go-to model for everyday flying. It’s large enough to have a good presence in the air and provide enough inertia to carry the model through aerobatic maneuvers while being easily transported. The post Graupner HoTTigger V2 appeared first on Model Airplane News.
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JShumate

JShumate

 

Tips for Formers and Stringers

As my current workshop project continues, I thought it would be a good time to address proper installation and alignment of fuselage formers and stringers. There are some tips that make it easier to keep everything straight and properly aligned. Just take your time. Also, here’s a small but important correction from last time. With a little more research, I’ve discovered that the Nieuport 27 I wanted to build is actually a 24. It is the Nieuport 24 No. 4393 flown by MdL (NCO) André Loyseau Grandmaison of the Escadrille Squadron N 561, The Chimera painted on the side is what drew me to build this plane. Basically the difference between the type 24 and the 27 is the main gear axle and the tail skid arrangement. The 27 had a split axle similar to the Sopwith Camel and a internally sprung tail skid. The 24 has a solid axle like the Nieuport 17 and the fixed and faired tail skid as shown above. Getting back to the workbench, we left off with the two side frames assembled and ready for the cross members to be added. The first thing I did was to brace the sides in a vertical position (above the top view of the plans), and then using squares for alignment, I epoxied the firewall in place. The top longerons were first pinned to the plans then the top and bottom cross-members were added from front to back, checking the framework for squareness. (The framework in inverted). Next the firewall was added and once the epoxy cured, I added the hardwood landing gear channels again using epoxy. Here you see the balsa block added to the bottom of the firewall to fill the area forward of the front landing gear channel block. After the cross-members are added, check the framework for squareness and then add all the bottom diagonals gluing them in place from front to back. To start the former and stringer assembly, you start at the front and work back toward the tail. There is a circular cowl ring made from 1/8 inch lite plywood and this is epoxied to the face of the firewall. But before gluing it into place, I glued the top and side formers to the backside of the former ring. This makes it easy to center the cowl ring as the epoxy cures. Here’s the front of the cowl ring in place I used 15 minute epoxy to glue it to the firewall. Using 1/8-inch balsa, I made all of the top and side formers cutting them with the stringer slots in place. Lots of time was spend on the CAD drawings to make sure everything would line up properly. Start placing the top formers at their proper locations while using the stringers as a guide. Basically all the formers have to be centered at their given locations. I tack glue the formers in place in case they need to be tweaked during construction. The section between the firewall and the second former will be sheeted over so the stringers do not have to be glued in place here at this time. Here you see the aft formers and stringers in place. Again, I used the stringers to help properly position the formers. Use your side view plans drawings as a guide. All the stringers have to be parallel to one another. Some of the side formers shown below have not yet been glued in place. Using the stringers as guides, continue adding the side formers in place. Here some of the formers have not yet been glued in place. Stand back a little bit and look at the stringers. They should be parallel to one another and should mate with the slots in the formers without having to bend them up or down. They should slip easily into place. If not, you can adjust the slot slightly by enlarging them so the stringer remains straight. Glue in place and then add a little scrap balsa to fill in the gap. At the very end of the stringers, there is a top former at the front of the horizontal stabilizer saddle. The formers but up against the former and are glued in place. Some internal blocking is then added to support the ends of the stringers. Also the aft ends of the side stringers end flush with the second to last framework vertical. To keep the stringers running true, any where they interfere with a framwork vertical or diagonal member, the stringer is notched and then glued in place. This add plenty of strength to the entire fuselage assembly. Stay tuned as the Nieuport 24 project continues.     The post Tips for Formers and Stringers appeared first on Model Airplane News.
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JShumate

JShumate

 

Pro Tips for Flying Twins

There’s just something special about twin-engine airplanes. Whenever a twin shows up at the flying field, most modelers stop what they’re doing and go over to check it out. Maybe it’s the sound of the engines as they sync into and out of phase while the model is in the air; or perhaps it’s the overall size and proportions of the model with its two or more engines slung under its wings. Whatever the reason, twins have been very popular choices for scale modelers, and they continue to draw attention wherever and whenever they fly. (Above) Twin-engine aircraft, especially WW II military warbirds are exciting and always draw a crowd. Built by Paul LeTourneau, David Malchione’s monster-scale B-26 is an awesome sight in the air and on the flightline. Paul enlarged Jerry Bates plans to a 170-inch span, and powered the Marauder with a pair of Desert Aircraft DA-100 gas engines. (Photo by Palmer Johnson.) Over the years, I have designed and flown several giant-scale twins and very rarely have I had any engine-out problems. My first big twin was my 140-inch-span Douglas DC-3/C-47. At the time, Quadra 35s were the only real choices for gas engines, but I have seen this design flown very nicely with a pair of Enya 1.55 4-stroke glow engines. The next was the 101-inch-span, B-25 Mitchell medium bomber powered by two Zenoah G-23s. The B-25 remains one of my most popular designs, and I have sold about 2,000 sets of plans for it. If I were to build another, I would power it with the new G-26 gas engine. Next was my G-38-powered 114-inch-span Beechcraft D-18, which was followed by my 1/7-scale, 114-inch-span P-61 Black Widow (also powered by G-38s). My last twin, the P-38 Lightning, also has a span of 114 inches and was designed around a pair of G-45 engines. With this article, I’ll highlight some of the basic do’s and don’ts for your first twin-engine airplane. ENGINE SETUP (Above) I always use soft mounts such as these from Scale Aviation because they keep the airframe and the engines happy. (Above) Twin aircraft are typically lost when one engine fails because the fuel screen in its carb is dirty. Make sure that your engine gets clean fuel by using effective filters in your fuel container and in your model’s fuel system The most important thing to consider when flying twins is engine reliability. I have hundreds of flights on my P-38 and my Black Widow and have never suffered an engine-out. This is because I take the time to set the engines up properly. To keep the engines running reliably, you must supply them with clean fuel. I see it all the time at the flying field: an engine quits because the filter screens inside the carb are clogged and fuel flow suffers. I always use two filters in my fuel container, a felt clunk filter and an inline paper filter. Clunk filters backed up with in-line filters between the engines and the model’s fuel tanks are standard equipment on all my models. Clean, well-filtered fuel is also very important for glow-engine aircraft. I use industrial-grade filters that you can buy at most small-engine and lawnmower shops. They are good insurance and should always be used. It is also very important to set both of your engines up so they are absolutely identical in operation. This means you use the same servos and the same clevises and pushrods in their throttle linkages. Make sure you have the linkages installed in the same holes in the servo arms and that both carburetors move the same amount and are linear in response to the movement of the transmitter throttle stick. This may take a little work, but believe me, you can’t control a twin without having identical engine setups. Of course, you want to balance the props properly and make sure the mufflers are the same and are tightened into place properly. It wouldn’t be a bad idea to safety-wire the muffler bolts so there’s no chance of one coming loose. I like to use soft mounts, and I use either the B&B Specialties or the Scale Aviation brand of soft mounts of the size I need for the engine in use. ENGINE SYNC (Above) When setting up a twin, especially a tail-dragger like this D-18 built by Dennis Crooks, be sure to set the engine side thrust properly. If you don’t, the model will torque-turn to the left! When it comes to syncing the engines’ rpm, do not lean the slower engine to increase its speed. This will lead to its over-heating and eventually dying at the worst possible time. Instead, richen the faster one slightly to decrease its rpm. For the most part, with both engines carefully set up, it is more important to have reliable engines than to have their rpm matched exactly. I always use gasoline engines, and in fact, I have only used engines with magneto ignitions. True, a CD ignition offers easy hand starting, a lower idle and probably a little more top-end power. But I prefer the simplicity and reliability of a magneto. If, however, you prefer to use glow engines to power your twin, be sure to completely break the engines in and adjust the carburetors for a reliable idle and a smooth transition through the midrange. It would also be a good idea to use an onboard glow-driver system (one for each engine) to keep the glow plug lit. This will greatly improve engine reliability, especially when set up to come on at and below 1/4 throttle. SIDE-TO-SIDE SETUP (Above) The very popular P-38 Lightning is one of my favorite twin-engine designs. I have hundreds of flights on it and have never had an engine out. Its Zenoah G-45 gas engines offer excellent, reliable power. For a tail-dragger aircraft, I set the left engine with zero offset, and I set the right engine with 3 degrees of right thrust. I came to this setup when I was fine-tuning my Beech D-18. The Paul Matt 3-views I used to design the model, showed each engine with 2 degrees of outboard thrust. As it turned out, this produced a tremendous amount of left torque. Even with full right rudder, the D-18 always turned to the left on takeoff. My zero and 3 degrees setup solved the problem nicely. The effect of left torque turning is much less of an issue with aircraft that are equipped with tricycle landing gear. I feel that this offset thrust setup also helps during an engine-out. How much engine down thrust you need is more a matter of how the airplane flies and the model’s wing and tail-surface incidences. You can adjust this after several test flights. FLYING TWINS (Above) Here is my first Beechcraft D-18. It flew great, but I lost it after one engine signed off because my electric-powered smoke system was still pumping smoke oil into my mufflers when I pulled the throttles back. (Above) twins like my P-38 Lightning that are equipped with tricycle landing gear are less likely to torque-turn to the left on takeoff. But having the correct engine side thrust is always very important for proper performance. (Above) my B-25 Mitchell medium bomber remains one of my most popular designs. It has a lot going for it, twin tails, gas engines, tricycle landing gear, almost everyone recognizes it and it has excellent flight characteristics. As a rule, twin-tail airplanes are better for twin engines than single-tail designs. There’s no great secret to successfully flying twins; the important thing is to fly smoothly and not to be heavy-handed with control inputs. I once saw a really nice C-47 destroyed because its pilot yanked it off the ground on takeoff and tried to fly it away with its nose at close to 40 degrees above the horizon. Of course, one engine sagged and went offline, and the model lost power and airspeed at a very low altitude. Had the pilot flown his model smoothly at a gradual departure angle, the engine may never have quit. Even if an engine does sign off, if you have enough altitude and you maintain airspeed, you can save the model by remembering always to fly it. Advance the throttles smoothly; don’t just jam them full open for takeoff. As long as both engines are running, flying a twin is no different from flying a single-engine aircraft. If you do lose an engine, throttle back slightly and determine which engine is out. Then adjust the rudder trim to compensate for the offset thrust and unwanted yaw, and think about bringing the model in for a landing. Try not to turn sharply into the dead engine, but more important, maintain the proper airspeed while you set up your emergency landing. Most multi-engine models have a higher than normal wing loading. Many twins are lost because the pilot doesn’t keep the wings flying with the proper airspeed. As a rule, twin-tail airplanes are better for twin engines than single-tail designs. This is because the rudders are more effective when positioned in the propwash. Full-scale planes have two rudders for the same reason. If you want a single-tail twin, pick one with a big rudder and fin. If you want to install an electric-pump smoke system (or two), set them up so that they will come on at 1/4 throttle and higher. If they come on at lower than 1/4 throttle, the smoke oil can flood the muffler and cause the engine to die. Believe me, I know; I lost my first D-18 because I did not switch the smoke off before I pulled the throttles back. A simple radio mix can also be used to have the smoke switch tied to the throttle position, so there’s no chance of it switching on when the engines are below 1/4 power. Flying twins is a source of great pleasure and always brings fun to the flying field. If you set your engines up properly and fly your model reasonably, you, too, will enjoy that multi-engine excitement. Big or small, twins are hard to beat! By Nick Ziroli Sr., Photos by Nick Ziroli Sr. & Palmer Johnson. Part of the Model Airplane News “Classic Archive” Collection of Online Articles. The post Pro Tips for Flying Twins appeared first on Model Airplane News.
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Pro Tips for Flying Twins

There’s just something special about twin-engine airplanes. Whenever a twin shows up at the flying field, most modelers stop what they’re doing and go over to check it out. Maybe it’s the sound of the engines as they sync into and out of phase while the model is in the air; or perhaps it’s the overall size and proportions of the model with its two or more engines slung under its wings. Whatever the reason, twins have been very popular choices for scale modelers, and they continue to draw attention wherever and whenever they fly. (Above) Twin-engine aircraft, especially WW II military warbirds are exciting and always draw a crowd. Built by Paul LeTourneau, David Malchione’s monster-scale B-26 is an awesome sight in the air and on the flightline. Paul enlarged Jerry Bates plans to a 170-inch span, and powered the Marauder with a pair of Desert Aircraft DA-100 gas engines. (Photo by Palmer Johnson.) Over the years, I have designed and flown several giant-scale twins and very rarely have I had any engine-out problems. My first big twin was my 140-inch-span Douglas DC-3/C-47. At the time, Quadra 35s were the only real choices for gas engines, but I have seen this design flown very nicely with a pair of Enya 1.55 4-stroke glow engines. The next was the 101-inch-span, B-25 Mitchell medium bomber powered by two Zenoah G-23s. The B-25 remains one of my most popular designs, and I have sold about 2,000 sets of plans for it. If I were to build another, I would power it with the new G-26 gas engine. Next was my G-38-powered 114-inch-span Beechcraft D-18, which was followed by my 1/7-scale, 114-inch-span P-61 Black Widow (also powered by G-38s). My last twin, the P-38 Lightning, also has a span of 114 inches and was designed around a pair of G-45 engines. With this article, I’ll highlight some of the basic do’s and don’ts for your first twin-engine airplane. ENGINE SETUP (Above) I always use soft mounts such as these from Scale Aviation because they keep the airframe and the engines happy. (Above) Twin aircraft are typically lost when one engine fails because the fuel screen in its carb is dirty. Make sure that your engine gets clean fuel by using effective filters in your fuel container and in your model’s fuel system The most important thing to consider when flying twins is engine reliability. I have hundreds of flights on my P-38 and my Black Widow and have never suffered an engine-out. This is because I take the time to set the engines up properly. To keep the engines running reliably, you must supply them with clean fuel. I see it all the time at the flying field: an engine quits because the filter screens inside the carb are clogged and fuel flow suffers. I always use two filters in my fuel container, a felt clunk filter and an inline paper filter. Clunk filters backed up with in-line filters between the engines and the model’s fuel tanks are standard equipment on all my models. Clean, well-filtered fuel is also very important for glow-engine aircraft. I use industrial-grade filters that you can buy at most small-engine and lawnmower shops. They are good insurance and should always be used. It is also very important to set both of your engines up so they are absolutely identical in operation. This means you use the same servos and the same clevises and pushrods in their throttle linkages. Make sure you have the linkages installed in the same holes in the servo arms and that both carburetors move the same amount and are linear in response to the movement of the transmitter throttle stick. This may take a little work, but believe me, you can’t control a twin without having identical engine setups. Of course, you want to balance the props properly and make sure the mufflers are the same and are tightened into place properly. It wouldn’t be a bad idea to safety-wire the muffler bolts so there’s no chance of one coming loose. I like to use soft mounts, and I use either the B&B Specialties or the Scale Aviation brand of soft mounts of the size I need for the engine in use. ENGINE SYNC (Above) When setting up a twin, especially a tail-dragger like this D-18 built by Dennis Crooks, be sure to set the engine side thrust properly. If you don’t, the model will torque-turn to the left! When it comes to syncing the engines’ rpm, do not lean the slower engine to increase its speed. This will lead to its over-heating and eventually dying at the worst possible time. Instead, richen the faster one slightly to decrease its rpm. For the most part, with both engines carefully set up, it is more important to have reliable engines than to have their rpm matched exactly. I always use gasoline engines, and in fact, I have only used engines with magneto ignitions. True, a CD ignition offers easy hand starting, a lower idle and probably a little more top-end power. But I prefer the simplicity and reliability of a magneto. If, however, you prefer to use glow engines to power your twin, be sure to completely break the engines in and adjust the carburetors for a reliable idle and a smooth transition through the midrange. It would also be a good idea to use an onboard glow-driver system (one for each engine) to keep the glow plug lit. This will greatly improve engine reliability, especially when set up to come on at and below 1/4 throttle. SIDE-TO-SIDE SETUP (Above) The very popular P-38 Lightning is one of my favorite twin-engine designs. I have hundreds of flights on it and have never had an engine out. Its Zenoah G-45 gas engines offer excellent, reliable power. For a tail-dragger aircraft, I set the left engine with zero offset, and I set the right engine with 3 degrees of right thrust. I came to this setup when I was fine-tuning my Beech D-18. The Paul Matt 3-views I used to design the model, showed each engine with 2 degrees of outboard thrust. As it turned out, this produced a tremendous amount of left torque. Even with full right rudder, the D-18 always turned to the left on takeoff. My zero and 3 degrees setup solved the problem nicely. The effect of left torque turning is much less of an issue with aircraft that are equipped with tricycle landing gear. I feel that this offset thrust setup also helps during an engine-out. How much engine down thrust you need is more a matter of how the airplane flies and the model’s wing and tail-surface incidences. You can adjust this after several test flights. FLYING TWINS (Above) Here is my first Beechcraft D-18. It flew great, but I lost it after one engine signed off because my electric-powered smoke system was still pumping smoke oil into my mufflers when I pulled the throttles back. (Above) twins like my P-38 Lightning that are equipped with tricycle landing gear are less likely to torque-turn to the left on takeoff. But having the correct engine side thrust is always very important for proper performance. (Above) my B-25 Mitchell medium bomber remains one of my most popular designs. It has a lot going for it, twin tails, gas engines, tricycle landing gear, almost everyone recognizes it and it has excellent flight characteristics. As a rule, twin-tail airplanes are better for twin engines than single-tail designs. There’s no great secret to successfully flying twins; the important thing is to fly smoothly and not to be heavy-handed with control inputs. I once saw a really nice C-47 destroyed because its pilot yanked it off the ground on takeoff and tried to fly it away with its nose at close to 40 degrees above the horizon. Of course, one engine sagged and went offline, and the model lost power and airspeed at a very low altitude. Had the pilot flown his model smoothly at a gradual departure angle, the engine may never have quit. Even if an engine does sign off, if you have enough altitude and you maintain airspeed, you can save the model by remembering always to fly it. Advance the throttles smoothly; don’t just jam them full open for takeoff. As long as both engines are running, flying a twin is no different from flying a single-engine aircraft. If you do lose an engine, throttle back slightly and determine which engine is out. Then adjust the rudder trim to compensate for the offset thrust and unwanted yaw, and think about bringing the model in for a landing. Try not to turn sharply into the dead engine, but more important, maintain the proper airspeed while you set up your emergency landing. Most multi-engine models have a higher than normal wing loading. Many twins are lost because the pilot doesn’t keep the wings flying with the proper airspeed. As a rule, twin-tail airplanes are better for twin engines than single-tail designs. This is because the rudders are more effective when positioned in the propwash. Full-scale planes have two rudders for the same reason. If you want a single-tail twin, pick one with a big rudder and fin. If you want to install an electric-pump smoke system (or two), set them up so that they will come on at 1/4 throttle and higher. If they come on at lower than 1/4 throttle, the smoke oil can flood the muffler and cause the engine to die. Believe me, I know; I lost my first D-18 because I did not switch the smoke off before I pulled the throttles back. A simple radio mix can also be used to have the smoke switch tied to the throttle position, so there’s no chance of it switching on when the engines are below 1/4 power. Flying twins is a source of great pleasure and always brings fun to the flying field. If you set your engines up properly and fly your model reasonably, you, too, will enjoy that multi-engine excitement. Big or small, twins are hard to beat! By Nick Ziroli Sr., Photos by Nick Ziroli Sr. & Palmer Johnson. Part of the Model Airplane News “Classic Archive” Collection of Online Articles. The post Pro Tips for Flying Twins appeared first on Model Airplane News.
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The latest News from the AMA

Today, the Senate passed the FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018, and we expect President Trump to sign it into law soon. This bill includes significant modifications to our hobby. While some of the changes are positive, and include provisions that AMA has championed, overall the bill is problematic, such as a 400 AGL altitude cap in Class G airspace. None of the provisions included in this bill go into effect immediately. The status quo remains – and we all should continue to fly in accordance with AMA’s safety guidelines until the FAA creates new rules, which could take some time. We will let you know as soon as we have more information on this process and timeline. In the meantime, the AMA is already working behind-the-scenes to minimize the impact of this bill and advocate for lighter regulatory restrictions on our hobby. In fact, the AMA anticipates there will be many opportunities to work with the FAA on protecting and preserving our hobby in the future. What do you think about this? Going forward will it harm our hobby or not?? Be sure to monitor your emails, social media and the www.modelaircraft.org/gov for the latest information. In addition, you can read a detailed assessment of the FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018 here or the entire Section 349 here. The post The latest News from the AMA appeared first on Model Airplane News.
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New for Premium Members

Mastering Adverse Yaw. As the name implies, adverse yaw is an adverse or unfavorable flight condition that, among other things, delay student pilots from achieving their solo abilities. Until his or her skills improve, struggling and committing to many hours of practice before soloing has been the burden of the student pilot. Learning to deal with adverse yaw which forces the nose of the plane to skis out of a turn goes a long way in helping them master their airplane. To read more of the article, as well as other exclusive online content, Click Here to subscribe to the Model Airplane News Premium website. The post New for Premium Members appeared first on Model Airplane News.
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19-foot RC Caproni Bomber

The hit of the Dayton 2018 WW I Dawn Patrol Rendezvous was the amazing RC 1/4-scale Italian Caproni Bomber built and flown by Greg Hahn of New Castle Indiana. The recent WWI Dawn Patrol Rendezvous drew dozens of impressive giant scale WW I aircraft both full size and RC, and the star of the radio control show was the Caproni. Designed and scratch built by Greg over a two year period, his model was inspired by the full-size aircraft on display at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force just across the field at Wright Patterson AFB where the event was held. With a wingspan of over 220 inches, Greg’s gigantic biplane bomber is powered by three gasoline engines. Video by Ken LaRock in NMUSAF Public Affairs-Public Domain The post 19-foot RC Caproni Bomber appeared first on Model Airplane News.
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Giant Morane Saulnier Type N

This RC French fighter has fully functional wing warping and an all-flying stabilizer/elevator set up. Brian Dean of East Hampton, New York, is a member of the Long Island Skyhawks and an accomplished giant-scale modeler. His latest build, a 33%-scale Morane Saulnier Type N, is the culmination of his modeling experience to date. The full-size Type N entered service in April 1915, and only 49 were ever built. The aircraft’s service life was short, and it was quickly rendered obsolete as more advanced aircraft developed. To create his unique model, Brian found an old set of Nick Ziroli’s Morane Saulnier Type N plans and enlarged and modified them to include the functional wing warping and all-flying stabilizer that the original full-size aircraft was equipped with. To do this, he also had to redraw the wing profile and replace the flat-bottom sport airfoil with thin under-cambered ribs to keep the wing flexible. Using scale drawings and documents, he copied the full-size aircraft’s wing-warping mechanism, with control cables riding through pulleys above the wings and a servo-operated arm beneath to pull the trailing edge of the wing panels up and down. The system works extremely well and  the model’s roll rate is equivalent to aircraft having ailerons. Brian created the model using the tried-and-true stick-build method, and he handmade all of its parts. The 107-inch-span plane is 64 inches long and weighs 24 pounds. The Morane is covered with natural Solartex and painted using several paint types, including gloss black spray paint, Nelson acrylic hobby paints, and some Floquil paints. He applied equal parts Minwax rub-on clear polyurethane satin with some brown Briwax brushed on and rubbed out. The N is powered by a 3W 55EI gas engine equipped with a K&S canister muffler. The model is finished in the colors of France’s great ace: Jean Marie Navarre. The model performs extremely well. Hats off to Brian for his amazing wing-warping project. Photos by Sal Calvagna, Video by Ron Preston The post Giant Morane Saulnier Type N appeared first on Model Airplane News.
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Monster Mitchell Bomber!

The amazing 1/3-scale B-25 bomber wowed the spectators and attendees at the Weston Park RC Show in the UK with its performance and its sound! The monsterous 326-pound B-25 Mitchell was flown by Roland Sabatschus, one of three brothers who spent more than 5 years building it. The 20-foot-span bomber is powered by twin 400cc Moki 4-strokes radial gas engines and was controlled by six receivers and 30 servos!! Thanks to  Peter and Dean Coxon (aka Tbobborap1) for capturing this flight on video.   The post Monster Mitchell Bomber! appeared first on Model Airplane News.
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Durafly EFX Racer

The Terracotta Edition. This high performance sports model has a 43.7 inch (1100mm) winspan and is a PNF for quick assembly. The Durafly EFX Racer has been designed from the ground up to offer the speed (100mph+) and strength normally reserved only for high end full composite models, but with the handling and satisfaction, only a Durafly model can offer. This 1100mm (43.7″) span model boasts a huge list of high-performance features that set the EFX apart from the competition. The AeroStar 3536 1780KV brushless outrunner for only the best performance. The pre-installed AeroStar 60A ESC has been optimized to deliver smoothly the power you need when you want it and all control surfaces use high speed, high torque digital 9g servo’s (metal geared on the ailerons) together with ball link connectors to deliver true precision and control throughout the speed range. The EFX Racer’s high performance doesn’t end with the electronics. The airframe has been engineered to be both rigid and lightweight, utilizing both glass and carbon fiber reinforcements throughout the model in combination with Super Compressed EPO foam and a highly polished surface finish to deliver the ultimate in performance in the air and the sleekest of looks on the ground. The EFX clips and screws together in minutes. Connect the control surfaces to the servos and install your own choice of receiver & lipo pack and you are ready to fly! Versatility is another of the design features of the EFX Racer. Right out of the box you’re provided with two different power options, 8×6 for 3cell and 7×6.5 for 4cell. For good all round sports performance a 2200mah 3S lipo on the 8×6 will give good speed and is recommended for pilots less experienced with fast models. However, for true high speeds and power when you open the throttle, a 1800mah 4S on the 7×6.5 is the winners choice and will get you going over 100mph. Complimenting the amazing speeds of the EFX is its stunning agility in the air. A simple under arm hand launch at 3/4 throttle from standing gets the EFX in the air and you’ll have unlimited vertical as soon as you open up to full (4S). A full house of controls (Aileron, Elevator, Rudder) gives the EFX remarkable aerobatics performance. Loops can be as BIG as you want them, rolls are very precise either fast or slow and the EFX will knife edge all day long! Thanks to the exceptionally strong airframe, high powered, high G maneuvers will not present a problem either. The EFX Racer will never fail you, but always leave you wanting more! It’s not all about going fast and turning hard, you’ll find the EFX handles exceptionally at slows speeds with both elegance and confidence inspiring grace. This is especially true in landing where you’ll find no hint of a stall and good control all the way down to the ground. Whatever set-up you choose and however you prefer to fly, your EFX Racer will perform and deliver time and time again and always keeping you coming back for more. Features: 100mph+ performance right out of the box (on 4S set-up). High-quality AeroStar Brushless Motor and ESC Powerful and fast 9g digital servos. Supplied with 8×6 propeller for 3S and 7×6.5 propeller for 4S set-ups. Super Compressed EPO foam construction. Glass and carbon fiber reinforcement throughout the airframe. No glue assembly. Just clicks and screws together in minutes. Ball link control system. Full complement of spare parts available. Specs: Wingspan: 1100mm (43″) Length: 760mm (30.2″) Flying weight: 910g (32oz) Motor: AeroStar 3536 1780KV Brushless Outrunner Prop: 8×6 (3S) and 7×6.5 (4S) supplied Battery: 1800mah 14.8V 4S (30C min) or 2200mah 11.1V 3S (30C min) Servos: 4 x 9g digital servos (metal geared on ailerons) ESC: AeroStar 60A Controls: 4 Channel (Throttle, Ailerons, Elevator, Rudder) Price: $172 Requires: 6 ch receiver and transmitter, 1800mah 14.8V 4S (30C min) on 7″ prop – 2200mah 11.1V 3S (30C min) on 8″ prop The post Durafly EFX Racer appeared first on Model Airplane News.
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New Building Project: Nieuport 27

MAN editor Gerry Yarrish just can’t seem to stay out of the workshop, and is always thinking of new projects to build. Gerry’s newest is a 27.5% scale Nieuport 27. The odd size is 10% larger than 1/4-scale to make the engine cowling 11 inches in diameter so his new RCGF USA 50cc twin cylinder boxer engine would fit. 100% designed and scratch build, Gerry’s new French WW1 fighter (the last in the “V” strut Sesquiplane series), has an 88 inch span and is all CAD designed. Watch for more updates. (Above) Here are the very early and basic working drawings for the fuselage structure. The airfoil has already been changed to a thicker section. (Above) Ready to laser cut the forward fuselage sides (Above) About 45 seconds to cut the sides from 1/8 inch Lite Ply. (Above) For large 1/4 inch plywood parts, I used my Stepcraft 420 CNC to machine the parts. (Above) Firewall and the forward fuselage support pieces for landing gear. The firewall already has mounting holes for the engine (Above) Long landing gear are epoxy together to form the whole part. (Above) Laying out the front parts. The areal above the main longerons between the cabane struts will be a removable hatch section. (Above) Adding the 1/4 inch square balsa longerons, verticals and diagonals. (Above) On the fly, I added 1/4 inch (2 degrees) of positive incidence for the horizontal stabilizer attachment section. This part will be added to my drawings later. (Above) This 1/4 inch landing gear block doubler is epoxied over the glue seam to strengthen the entire support structure. (Above) Here the two side frames are positioned to check alignment. Next step will be adding the firewall and checking the alignment so the cross pieces can be added. The post New Building Project: Nieuport 27 appeared first on Model Airplane News.
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Radial powered Giant Telemaster

What do you do when you have a new Moki 180 5-cylinder gas engine and you want to test run it before you install it in your 1/3-scale WW 1 Nieuport 28? Our good friend and flying buddy Whitney Philbrick decided to come up with a stable and easy to fly flying test bed! Mating the Moki 180 to the 12 foot Telemaster required a bit of firewall and fuselage modifications, but overall the combo was a pretty straightforward project. Whitney uses Airtronics radio gear to control his amazing giant scale “test stand” and everyone who’s seen it says it’s the sound that satisfies! Rumor has it Whitney is thinking with a landing gear change and modifying (Kit bashing) his 12 Foot Telemaster, he can produce a standoff scale TravelAir 6000. We see the resemblance! The post Radial powered Giant Telemaster appeared first on Model Airplane News.
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Durafly Mitsubishi J8M Shusui PNF

The Mitsubishi J8M Shusui was a World War II jet designed for the Japanese Navy  based on the German ME-163 Komet design. Only a small number of development planes were built to help combat the U.S. Boeing B-29 bombers. Durafly’s  37.4-inch-span Plug-n-Fly Shusui is made from molded EPO foam, with strong carbon reinforcement and features a hard plastic belly skid. The J8M Shusui has the same blistering performance of the earlier ME-163 and the wide track “dolly” for easier ground handling and takeoffs.The J8M Shusui comes with all electronics installed and requires you to hook up to your 6ch receiver. This is an easy build with only a few parts to be put together. A big hatch gives easy access to the battery bay and electronics. This plane is designed with the more experienced pilots in mind and has incredible flight performance. Full power climb outs, virtually unlimited vertical, huge loops, blistering rolls and very fast passes are easily had at full throttle. At slower speeds, the J8M Shusui is just as stable with no hint of a stall. Using the recommended 2200mAh 30-65C 3S lipo and supplied 6×4 prop, you can expect flight times well beyond 6 minutes and with excellent performance throughout. But if you want a bit more punch then a 1300~2200mAh 4S 30C+ lipo can be used with the standard J8M Shusui setup. For those of you looking for the ultimate scale experience, the optional rocket system is a simple drop-in affair (see manual for details), and will give you a thrill like no other. The working dolly-drop is activated at the flick of a switch on your transmitter, allowing for the most scale of take-offs. It’s time to “bounce” a few Allied planes at the local field. Features: Fully functional dolly style undercarriage Ready-made for drop-in optional rocket motor system High level of pre-assembly and minimal part count Tough EPO construction with extensive carbon reinforcement Super smooth surface finish Stable and high performing aerodynamic design Large canopy/battery hatch for easy access to electronics Authentic and re-applied decals and paint finish Standard setup will run 3S and 4S lipo batteries Specs: Wingspan: 950mm (37.4″) Length: 585mm (23′) Flying Weight: 1220g (with electronic and battery) ESC: Durafly 40A brushless ESC Motor: Durafly 2836 2200kv Outrunner Prop: 6×4 (2 included) Servos: 2 x metal geared 9g (aileron/elevator), 1 x 9g rudder Controls: 6 ch ‘Elevons’ (aileron/elevator), throttle, rudder, gear (dolly), optional rocket switch Price: $148.41 Requires: Your Own 5-6ch Tx/Rx with elevon/delta mixing 1300-2200mAh 3S~4S (11.1~14.8V) lipo battery (30C min) Optional: Turnigy receiver controlled switch (9107000266-0) C6-0 (18mm) class rocket motor from a local supplier The post Durafly Mitsubishi J8M Shusui PNF appeared first on Model Airplane News.
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Super Scale Radial Engine — Building a dummy warbird powerplant

With electric motors now being used more frequently in scale models, we have new possibilities for enhancing the model’s appearance. Because they’re virtually vibration free and run cleanly, they allow any dummy engine and motor mount to be constructed around them and all from readily available home workshop materials. I needed such a dummy engine for my converted 81-inch-span Hangar 9 P-47 Thunderbolt. In this article, I show you how I achieved this. ONE STEP AT A TIME
When I bought the model’s Hacker A60-L outrunner motor, I also purchased the motor mount designed for it. As clever and as lightweight as this mount is (it is fully adjustable and includes a support for the rear bearing of the motor), I could see that it would be very difficult to hide the bulky unit behind a dummy engine without having to resort to an extension shaft, which I always try to avoid. With such a gaping visible opening in the front of the cowl, I wanted to improve the model’s scale appearance, so I decided not to use it. Instead, I built a plywood cone-shaped dummy crankcase that the motor is secured to the front of and that also includes a backplate that can be radial-mounted to a bulkhead. The backplate also accepts the supplied flanged rear bearing used to support the quite considerable overhang of the A60-L motor. With the motor and dummy crankcase mount secured to the model, it all felt strong and rigid enough, so I ran the motor to check for problems. From a 95-percent charge, I see ì2900Wî on the Wattmeter (almost 4hp) and a steady 6,300rpm on the 22◊10 APC E propeller without a hint of a problem. So far, so good! To cool the motor, the supplied centrifugal fan pulls air in through four holes in the front of the dummy crankcase. This then passes through the windings and magnets and exits through four radial slots opposite the fan and also the rear of the backplate. The warmed air then spills into the cowl and out of the model through its semi-open cowl gills. The crankcase is made out of formers built up using laminations of 1/16-inch-thick ply that are then wrapped with two layers of 1/32-inch-thick ply with thin CA used to bond everything together. A lite-ply nose ring is glued to the front and sanded to blend with the cone, and then the entire structure is strengthened with a layer of glass cloth applied to the outside. More 1/16-inch-thick ply laminations are used to build the backplate, taking care to ensure that the rear bearing is centrally placed and does not bind with the rear of the motor. An outlet is required on the front underside of the mount for the three motor cables, but this can be hidden from view with a dummy crankcase sump screwed over the exit. With the motor now successfully mounted and hidden in its dummy crankcase, it was time to think about how to add the remaining detail. WILLIAMS WASP It was a relief to read that the Williams Bros. accessories were back in production. The 2-inch, scale, Wasp cylinders used in the dummy engine come individually packaged and include the pushrods and cylinder base used to mount them on the plywood flange. The photo also shows the nuts and short lengths of screw threads glued into the flange former and spark-plug wires formed out of plastic pushrod tubing. A STROKE OF LUCK The well-engineered, but bulky, motor mount that the combined dummy engine and new mount replaces. The major components for the dummy crankcaseóall from laminations of 1/32-and 1/16-inch-thick birch plywood. The crankcase and backplate with the Hacker outrunner motor in place. The completed cylinder-mounting flange with the cylinders glued to it. The remaining engine components are also visible. The painted crankcase showing how the cylinder mounting flange is prevented from moving forwards by the two magnetos and the distributor. The completed dummy Wasp engine with the Hacker A60-L outrunner motor installed inside the crankcase and with its spinner attached. When I completed the dummy crankcase, a search on the Web found that the once unavailable Williams Bros. Wasp engine cylinders are now being produced again (lucky indeed!). These obviously save an enormous amount of work while also bestowing a very realistic appearance on the engine. Soon, nine scale Wasp cylinders were on the way to me. At this stage, I didn’t know if, indeed, the completed engine would fit in the Thunderbolt’s cowl. As it turned out, I had to truncate each cylinder by 3/16 inch before gluing them to their cylinder bases that I, in turn, had glued to the circumference of a mounting flange made of laminations of 1/64-inch-thick ply wrapped around a former. This “cassette” of cylinders then slips over the front and onto the parallel portion of the crankcase and is retained by the dummy magnetos and the distributor. The magnetos, distributor and sump are built out of laminations of thin lite-ply. Building in laminations allows you to easily incorporate recesses that help hide the heads of the screws that secure the items in holes drilled in the crankcase. The formed threads are strengthened with thin CA. Small nuts with short lengths of screw threads are used to represent the studs and nuts that bolt the crankcase halves together, and they are glued around the flanged former. Finally, I used plastic pushrod tubing to simulate spark-plug wiring. I applied five or six coats of sanding sealant to all of the wooden components in quick succession. This effectively coats everything with a plastic-like surface that only took one brushed coat of gray enamel to color over. The finish is not perfect but more like the casting it is meant to represent. I sprayed the cylinders with aluminum paint and then with a little matte black to tone them down. The surprisingly tough motor mount has survived a season of flying and I have experienced no overheating problems with the Hacker motor. The dummy engine and mount without the motor weigh 8 ounces, and to fit within the cowl of my Thunderbolt, it measures 7æ inches in diameter over its widest point. As explained previously, I had to shorten the cylinders slightly to achieve this, so technically, I am flying on a high-revving, short-stroke Wasp engine! TEXT & PHOTOS BY PETE NICHOLSON The post Super Scale Radial Engine — Building a dummy warbird powerplant appeared first on Model Airplane News.
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JShumate

JShumate

 

Durafly T-28 Trojan

Durafly T-28 Trojan Naval Aviation Centennial Edition 1100mm This striking version of the Durafly T-28 Trojan comes in a unique color scheme for the Naval Aviation Centennial (1911-2011) (US Navy). The Durafly T-28 is an impressive RC plane to fly and even has the ability to be upgraded for the extreme challenge of FPV flying. The T-28 is an extremely popular warbird and RC flying model and this version has a great list of features, like pre-installed navigation lights, servo-less electric retracts with gear doors, pre-installed servos which include flaps and a fully functional dive brake. There is a huge internal bay to house all your electronics plus your 4S battery. Under the scale cowl, we have added an AeroStar 3536-750kv brushless out-runner motor coupled with an AeroStar 45A ESC to drive a scale 3-bladed propeller. This will provide you with all the power you need for loops and rolls and awesome performance. The servo-less electronic tricycle undercarriage makes ground handling, take off’s and landings a breeze. If you want to get into the excitement of FPV flying then the Trojans cockpit is specifically designed for FPV flight. Just add your own Pan and tilt camera with a head tracker, VTX and antennas. FPV is a great way to get that full flying experience being fully immersed in the T-28’s cockpit. The Durafly T-28 Trojan is designed to screw together in just 6 easy steps, getting you in the air faster and glue free. All electrics are pre-installed and all you need to add is your choice of transmitter and receiver, battery and of course your choice of FPV equipment. Features: Ultimate scale details from the leader in the 1100mm class warbirds Fully functional retracts with gear doors Fully functional dive brake Day bright LED navigation lights Ultra smooth and super tough EPO foam Naval Aviation Centennial color scheme Designed to run on a 4S power set up and performance to match 6~9 Channels (ailerons, elevator, throttle, rudder, flaps, landing gear, dive brake, FPV pan and tilt) FPV cockpit mount and revised cockpit included Specs: Wingspan: 1100mm (43″) Length: 930mm Flying Weight: 1460g Motor: 3536-750kv brushless outrunner ESC: Durafly 45A Propeller: 10×6 3-blade Price: $209.17 Includes all hardware Requires: 6~9 Channel TX/RX 2200mAh 4s (30~65C) Lipo Battery FPV equipment (optional) The post Durafly T-28 Trojan appeared first on Model Airplane News.
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JShumate

JShumate

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