Jump to content

All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Earlier
  2. JShumate

    COVID-19 UPDATES

    Attention Contest Directors and Event Managers POSTED 03.26.2020 As we continue to address efforts to reduce the spread of COVID-19, we have some new developments that might affect an event you have scheduled through May 31, 2020. The AMA will be extending its offer to reschedule events scheduled between now and May 31, 2020, to later this year at no charge. AMA will waive all fees and costs associated with reprocessing the sanction, to include reissuing any insurance certificates and replacing sanctioned ads in the Model Aviation sanctioned event calendar. Because of deadlines with Model Aviation magazine, we cannot guarantee that rescheduled events will be reflected immediately in the magazine. We will make every effort to promptly reschedule the event to include updating the online event listing at www.modelaircraft.org/events. For assistance, please contact Colleen Pierce at compet*tion@modelaircraft.org. Be safe, AMA Frequently Asked Questions While AMA Works Remotely POSTED 03.22.2020 Dear AMA Members, Thank you for your patience and cooperation while do our part to address COVID-19. The safety of our staff, members, and community are AMA’s top priority. Together we can work to slow the spread of COVID-19 and eventually life will return to normal. We are regularly monitoring and implementing guidance from national and local health officials and will continue to keep you updated as news develops. Delaware County, Indiana, has issued a Disaster Emergency Declaration mandating that non-essential businesses must “immediately close and cease operations” to slow the spread of COVID-19. As a result, the AMA International Aeromodeling Center (IAC) and Headquarters, which are in Delaware County, Indiana, are immediately closed to the public and staff until further notice. At this time, Delaware County has not issued a date at which the mandate will be lifted. AMA has been preparing for this scenario and has implemented a remote work program to sustain most member services. We appreciate your patience while we fulfill member services while working remotely. Click here to read some frequently asked questions that relate to the temporary closure of the IAC because of the Delaware County emergency declaration. AMA Podcast on COVID-19 POSTED 03.20.2020 AMA Operations To Work Remotely POSTED 03.19.2020 Since 1936, safety has been a key pillar of AMA, to include the safety of our members, staff, and community. We at AMA are following the COVID-19 guidance by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and local health officials. As a result, some of our AMA Headquarters operational st*ff will be working remotely. Whether staff members are serving inside AMA Headquarters or working remotely, membership services remain at the core of AMA! We ask you be patient as we implement a remote work environment, but rest assured that we will continue to provide member services to include sanctioning, club chartering, content generation (email, videos, magazines, etc…), and insurance fulfillment. St*ff can still be contacted using the same email and phone extension provided www.modelaircraft.org. While AMA Headquarters is taking steps to slow down the spread of COVID-19, you can help too. You can enjoy model aviation operations and follow CDC recommendations by keeping 6 feet of separation from other operators, regularly washing your hands, and sanitizing surfaces. In addition, AMA is temporarily amending our sanctioning policy to assist with Contest Directors and Event Managers who are rescheduling events because of COVID-19 or local travel restrictions. You can read more about AMA’s recommendations and policies by scrolling down below. This is an evolving situation. As details change, we will keep you posted. As always, continue to follow CDC and local officials. Thank you and safe flying! Chad Budreau, AMA Executive Director VIEW FROM HQ VIDEO POST POSTED 03.18.2020 AMA AMENDS SANCTION POLICY POSTED 03.16.2020 Safety is important to our members and the public. AMA is continuing to monitor COVID-19 guidelines and recommendations from the Center for Disease Control (CDC). Because of the administrative and insurance costs associated with issuing a sanction for an event, AMA policy does not offer refunds or credits for canceled or rescheduled events. However, given the evolving situation with COVID-19, AMA will be temporarily amending this policy for events scheduled through April 30, 2020. If a CD or EM cancels an event, AMA will allow sanctions, events ads purchased through the sanctioning portal, and insurance certificates to be rescheduled at no additional charge. Events must be rescheduled during the 2020 calendar year. We will make every effort to promptly reschedule the event to include updating the online event listing at www.modelaircraft.org/events. Because of deadlines with Model Aviation magazine, we cannot guarantee rescheduled events will be reflected immediately in the magazine. To reschedule your event taking place between now and April 30, 2020, at no charge, please email cpierce@modelaircraft.org or call 765.287.1256 x 252 and provide the name of the CD or EM, event details, and new date change. We’ll continue to keep you updated on our policy and protocol as the situation evolves. Please continue to follow the recommendations of the CDC and take extra precautions on how to safely conduct events at www.modelaircraft.org/covid-19. Thank you, Chad Budreau, AMA Executive Director FLYING WITHIN CDC RECOMMENDATIONS POSTED 03.12.2020 Dear members, As you might have heard, the Weak Signal’s 2020 Toledo Show: R/C Model Expo has been canceled because of concerns about the Coronavirus or COVID-19. AMA supports and understands this difficult decision and we look forward to the show in 2021. Many members might question whether to attend or cancel other aeromodeling events, compet*tions, or fun-flys. As the situation evolves with COVID-19, we recommend that you continue to monitor and follow guidelines suggested by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Because many events take place outdoors and do not require close contact with others in confined spaces, outdoor events could be considered lower risk. The safety of our members and public along with measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19 are important. With that noted, members, club officers, contest directors, and event managers should take extra precautions at outdoor events and flying fields to include: Regularly clean and disinfect railings, tables, charging stations, and other surfaces. Provide soap and water and/or hand sanitizers that contain at least 60% alcohol and encourage handwashing. Practice social distancing not only at the flight line, but in the pits and other areas. If pilots or members have symptoms or feel sick, encourage them to go home or seek medical attention. Discuss the importance of handwashing, limiting close contact, and other preventative measures at pilots’ meetings, during announcements, and through signage from the CDC. Fly safe! Chad Budreau, AMA Executive Director View the full article
  3. JShumate

    Get out and fly!

    Looks like you can still get out and fly a model airplane! View the full article
  4. Dear AMA Members, Thank you for your patience and cooperation while we do our part to address COVID-19. The safety of our staff, members, and community are AMA’s top priority. Together we can work together to slow the spread of COVID-19 and eventually life will return to normal. We are regularly monitoring and implementing guidance from national and local health officials and will continue to keep you updated as news develops. Delaware County, Indiana, has issued a Disaster Emergency Declaration mandating that non-essential businesses must “immediately close and cease operations” to slow the spread of COVID-19. As a result, the AMA International Aeromodeling Center (IAC) and Headquarters, which are in Delaware County, Indiana, are immediately closed to the public and staff until further notice. At this time, Delaware County has not issued a date at which the mandate will be lifted. AMA has been preparing for this scenario and has implemented a remote work program to sustain most member services. We appreciate your patience while we fulfill member services while working remotely. Following are some frequently asked questions that relate to the temporary closure of the IAC because of the Delaware County emergency declaration. Q: How can I get help with questions about my membership or joining the AMA? A: Although the membership staff is not physically at the IAC, the department is working remotely and is operational. In addition to visiting www.modelaircraft.org/join, you can call 1-765-287-1256 ext. 129, or email membership@modelaircraft.org. Q: I mailed my AMA application or renewal. How soon will it be processed so that I can begin receiving my benefits including the magazine and insurance? A: Although we might not be able to immediately retrieve your mailed membership application, your benefits—including insurance—will begin retroactive to the date stamp on the envelope. Your membership card and magazine might experience delays in shipping. If you need further assistance, please contact membership at 1-765-287-1256 ext. 129, or email membership@modelaircraft.org. Q: How do I contact a staff member or a department if I have a question? A: Although staff is working remotely, they can answer phone calls, reply to emails, and work in the membership database. You can reference the AMA Staff Directory on the AMA website for email and phone number listings. Q: Will I still receive Model Aviation or Park Pilot magazine? A: You might experience delays that are out of our control, such as shutdowns with the printers or postal services, but our magazine team is operational and is continuing to produce the magazine as a member benefit. Members with access to the digital versions of the magazines, or those would like to add the digital version of Model Aviation to their membership benefits package, can learn more at http://modelaviation.com/digital. For those who don’t currently subscribe to our digital magazine versions, you might not know that they are typically available as much as two weeks before the print version is generally received. Each digital version contains bonus features such as videos and other forms of additional content. Please note: Park Pilot subscribers automatically have access to Park Pilot digital. Learn more at www.theParkPilot.org/digital. Q: Are IAC events or the Nats canceled? A: All events at the IAC during the emergency declaration are canceled or postponed.. Most of the other events, such as the Nats, have not been canceled because they take place later in the year. You can read our IAC event calendar at www.modelaicraft.org/iac-calendar. Q: Can I fly at the IAC? A: AMA is not inviting members to the property, but the flying sites will be accessible. Event or large groups of people are prohibited. Always follow CDC and local health official guidelines to protect yourself and others. There are steps you can take to safely enjoy model aviation and comply with CDC recommendations, such as keeping 6 feet of separation from other operators, regularly washing your hands, and sanitizing surfaces. You can read more guidance at www.modelaircraft.org/covid-19. In compliance with the Delaware County guidelines, AMA buildings (including bathrooms) are closed and staff will not be on hand for extra sanitation. Q: Can I reschedule a sanction due to COVID-19? A: AMA is amending our sanctioning policy to allow CDs and EMs to reschedule their event scheduled between now and April 30, 2020, to later this year at no charge. AMA will pay for any additional processing fees to include with the magazine and insurance. Our sanctioning team can assist you at cpierce@modelaircraft.org or 1-765-287-1256 ext. 252. Q: I’m a club officer, CD, EM, or event org*nizer. What should I do to prevent the spread of COVID-19? A: Always follow CDC and local health official guidelines to protect yourself and others. There are steps you can take to safely enjoy model aviation and comply with CDC recommendations to include keeping 6 feet of separation from other operators, regularly washing your hands, and sanitizing surfaces. You can read more guidance at www.modelaircraft.org/covid-19. View the full article
  5. MORE EPISODES >> View the full article
  6. Safety is important to our members and the public. AMA is continuing to monitor COVID-19 guidelines and recommendations from the Center for Disease Control (CDC). Because of the administrative and insurance costs associated with issuing a sanction for an event, AMA policy does not offer refunds or credits for canceled or rescheduled events. However, given the evolving situation with COVID-19, AMA will be temporarily amending this policy for events scheduled through April 30, 2020. If a CD or EM cancels an event, AMA will allow sanctions, events ads purchased through the sanctioning portal, and insurance certificates to be rescheduled at no additional charge. Events must be rescheduled during the 2020 calendar year. We will make every effort to promptly reschedule the event to include updating the online event listing at www.modelaircraft.org/events. Because of deadlines with Model Aviation magazine, we cannot guarantee rescheduled events will be reflected immediately in the magazine. To reschedule your event taking place between now and April 30, 2020, at no charge, please email cpierce@modelaircraft.org or call 765.287.1256 x 252 and provide the name of the CD or EM, event details, and new date change. We’ll continue to keep you updated on our policy and protocol as the situation evolves. Please continue to follow the recommendations of the CDC and take extra precautions on how to safely conduct events at www.modelaircraft.org/covid-19. Thank you. View the full article
  7. In the sixth episode of season 6, Matt and Claire discuss Tiny Drones and the National Museum of the United States Air Force, a club that’s improving their flying site, and important information about the Weak Signals Toledo Show. LINKS: National Museum of the United States Air Force: http://nationalmuseum.af.mil National Museum of the United States Air Force Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/AFmuseum/ Latest Episode of the AMA Podcast: modelaircraft.org/podcast I Fly AMA Facebook Group: facebook.com/groups/iflyama April Model Aviation Digital Edition: modelaircraft.org/digital Spektrum S.M.A.R.T. Technology full review video: https://youtu.be/s6mCdHM8OKs AMA Government Advocacy Blog: modelaircraft.org/gov Where Will You Land? naming rights campaign information: modelaircraft.org/land Flying Site Improvement Grant information: modelaircraft.org/site-grant Keep Up with Toledo Show updates: toledoshow.com View the full article
  8. If you’ve been following my online Build-Along Series on the MAN website for my Sopwith Camel, then you know I have been featuring little mini projects as they pop up in the construction. Well, as master scale modeler Dave Platt has mentioned numerous times, “A scale model is never truly finished–you simply stop working in it.” Here as well, I first test flew the Sopwith Camel back in June and have flown it several times over the summer. All the while with my Zenoah G38 engine fully exposed in that big radial cowling. So, to help dress up the Camel, I have begun to install a d*mmy rotary engine. I hope you find the techniques involved interesting as they can be used on any similar round nosed airplane you might be building. Starting point Balsa USA is a great source for all things WW1 and they have been offering nice molded fiberglass d*mmy engines for a long time. I picked up a 9-cylinder molding at the recent Rhinebeck Jamboree and wasted no time in getting it detailed out and ready to add the Camel’s engine compartment. Nicely molded from several layers of fiberglass cloth, the BUSA molding is nicely detailed. You would spend a lot more time trying to make your own. This is an older photo, the one I just picked up has a nice gel coat finish on the front. The first thing to do with any molded fiberglass part is to use a grinding wheel and a Moto-tool and remove any sharp edges or areas starved of resin. After this, throw it in the kitchen sink and scrub it with dish washing detergent so you can remove any left over parting agent that might still be on the surfaces. Here you see the open end of the cowling, it is important to use a molded engine that will fit properly. The 1/4-scale BUSA rotary engine is 7 3/4 inches in diameter, a perfect fit. With the cowling removed you will notice I installed a ballast box filled with lead shot and resin right over the engine. I made it’s dimensions with the use of a d*mmy engine in mind. Here’s the front end of the G38 with it flywheel and magnet for the magneto ignition showing proudly in front of the cylinder head. The engine is installed upside-down with the cylinder and m*ffler both pointing downward. The first thing to do is to open up the molded engine to clear the ignition block. But more importantly, the opening is also for cooling airflow to enter the engine compartment. Making the opening is easy with a cutoff disc and a Dremel. I simply removed one of the cylinders and opened up the area between the other cylinders as shown here. Also, the center opening for the crankcase, has to be big enough to fit over the G-38’s propeller hub. Here I am test fitting the molding over the G-38. The opening should provide about 1/8 inch of clearance all around so vibration won’t cause any chaffing of parts. You can also see that cylinder is right in the line of fire for airflow. So the molding fits nicely centered over the G38 while contacting the front of the ballast box. Another good thing about the box structure is that it helps channel airflow down toward and around the engine and not up in the empty space about the engine. Before painting, I drilled holes and added nuts and scr*ws to add detail to the engine case. Also, I drilled offset holes in the engine case for the bushing (from short sections of brass tubes), for the pushrods which will be added later. Medium and Thick ZAP CA glue is used throughout. Be light with the kicker as it can cause the glue to foam up, which will not help the finish. You might also have noticed the lite-ply guide/supports I glued to the engine molding. These have 1/16 inch holes in them set at the proper spacing to hold the pushrod wires. Here is the simple cut job loaded into my laser cutter. Using my 40W Full Spectrum Laser Hobby Laser I was able to import some simple CAD drawing and cut out the eight are required for the d*mmy engine. You can see the lite-ply guide plates in detail here below. Painting To begin the paint job, I start with a coat of metallic silver from Décor. This paint is fast drying and it gives a real metallic almost chrome look to the part. I like using this bright coat as the first layer which I will build the weathering coats onto later in the process. The paint really makes all the bits and pieces come together for a scale appearance. The 16 pushrods are made from pieces of 1/16 inch welding wire. So here the cylinders, and the back webbing have been spray painted flat black. I have found that there is no need to carefully mask off the engine case while spraying the cylinders. Again here I use Decor spray paint which dries very quickly and is gasoline proof when dry. As you can see, there is a slight amount of over spray on the edges of the crankcase, and that’s what we want. Additional detailing and weathering will be added to the engine to help bring out the finer detail and overall realism a scale model requires. The next step is to add the pushrods. For the Sopwith Camel, I want a more “used” appearance. Here above, we have the 16 pushrod wires for the rotary engine. I used 1/16 inch welding wire and sanded them smooth and clean. They has a natural metal finish so no painting is required. I also bent one end 90 degrees. The length is about 1/4 inch. Before installing the pushrods, I took some 320 grit sandpaper and glued it to some wood to form sanding sticks. A wide one for the top of the cylinder and a narrow one for the base. As you can see, by carefully sanding away the black paint, you expose the underlying silver and gray colors. This adds depth and kills some of the shine of the black paint. As with everything else about scale modeling and weathering, it takes a subtle touch. Don’t get heavy handed as you will only make the silver lines (tops of the cooling fins), wider. After sanding the fins, I go around the engine case and apply a very thin layer of watered down acrylic black to all the details. When dry, this black will being out the surface details. Here you see two of the pushrod wires inserted into the wood guide plate and inserted into the brass bushing tubes at the crankcase. A little ZAP will hold them in place. These top plates will be covered over by the lip of the engine cowling and not seen. Here all the pushrods are in place. They are glued at the top bent ends as well as inside the bushing tubes from the inside of the engine molding. Next I mist a very light coat of light gray over the chrome silver base color of the crankcase and let dry. I also use a thin brush and add a gray wash to flat areas and in corners where the real full-size engine would gather dust and oil residue. Here you see the gray and black wash still puddled around some of the nuts and scr*ws around the engine and the base of the cylinders. Now let it dry. You can speed the process with a heat gun, but I find that letting the washes evaporate naturally produces the best looking staining. The over all project took only about 10 hours and spread over a few days, that’s no time at all. I finally decided to attach the molded engine to the inside of the engine cowling. This is the typical way to affixing it to a model, but if you have the room, you can also install standoffs to the firewall around the G38 and attach the d*mmy rotary that way. Here’s how I did it. You’ll notice the wood guide plates I installed above each cylinder. These both support the pushrod wire ends and, give excellent attachment points for the molding to be glued to the inside of the engine cowling. After sanding the paint off of the edges of the guide plates, set the d*mmy engine in position over the model’s real engine and then you reattach the engine cowling. Make sure the d*mmy engine is centered around the prop hub and that nothing comes in contact with the G38 when the propeller shaft is turned. Now tack glue a couple of the guide plates to the inside of the cowling using Thick Zap and kicker. Remember, before applying any glue, it is very important to clean off the inner surface of the cowling to ensure a strong glue bond. I use MEK to remove all the paint and primer from the inner surface of the fiberglass cowling. After the glue sets, tack glue a couple more plates to the inside of the cowling. Once you have three or four plates glued in place, you can remove the cowling. Here’s a close up of one of the plates glued to the cowling. Finish gluing the rest of the guide plates in place being sure to build up a strong fillet around the guide plates. After all the attachment points have been secured, be sure to make some openings in the webs between the cylinders. These are to get to any scr*ws or other attachment points for securing your engine cowling in place. All you need is an opening large enough to fit a scr*wdriver . With my magnetically secured cowling, I also installed two scr*ws to prevent the cowling from rotating due to engine vibration. The scr*ws go through the rear plywood cowling ring and thread into hard points in the front of the firewall. Here you see the backside of the d*mmy engine. Notice that there’s plenty of space around the d*mmy engine for airflow to cool the engine. Most of the airflow will be through the large opening just in front of the cylinder. Also if there is a gap between the cowling and any of the plates, (as shown here to the right), add a scr*p of lite ply to fill in the space. Use plenty of Zap and kicker. Reinstall the engine cowling and check the clearances around the model’s engine. Try to have at least 1/8 inch all around. When everything lines up properly, remove the engine one more time and give it a few light coats of honey colored clear Urethane spray finish. This will seal the wood guide plates and coat the pushrods so they don’t corrode. Also the color give the engine a semi wet look like it just ran and is covered with caster oil. So, that’s it! The molded fiberglass d*mmy rotary engine from Balsa USA is an excellent starting point for any round nose airplane. It certainly is a lot less work than scratch building your own WW1 cover-up. After a couple of flight, check the clearances between the scale engine and the prop hub. If anything is rubbing, use a Dremel Moto-Tool and grind away any interference areas to increase the clearance. Also pay attention to how your engine runs. If it seems to be running hotter than before, adjust the carb., to richen the top end a little. And recheck the idle transition. Have fun! The post Install a d*mmy Scale Engine appeared first on Model Airplane News. View the full article
  9. Model Airplane News editor Gerry Yarrish has been working on his latest scale project, a WW I French Nieuport 24 for a little over a year now and he has made a lot of progress lately. A self-designed RC airplane, Gerr’s Nieuport started out as a set of 3-views which he then traced using his CAD program. Once he had the scale outline worked out, he then added all the modeling construction details, printed out the plans and started gluing sticks together. Several posts have been uploading showing Gerry’s workshop project as it went together. This past weekend, he started working on the c*ckpit interior adding the details and parts he made from scratch. Everything is scale and sized for his 27.5% scale biplane. So, here’s how it looks today. The scale pilot seat is removable and it covers the servos which are mounted to the c*ckpit floor. Here is the ammo cupboard which is basically in place of a standard instrument panel. Notice the fuel sight gauge in the center. The headrest padding is made from black polymer clay. If has a leather texture added. Notice the rubber tubing on the front edge of the c*ckpit. It will be covered with leather shortly! Above are all the parts for the throttle quadrant. They are made of thin acrylic sheet and laser cut to shape. Throttle and chokes levers assembled. All painted and ready to install. Here are the throttle details and the gascolator installed next to the pilot seat. The only a*alogue instrument in the c*ckpit is the tachometer. The leather covering for the c*ckpit edge combing is made of leather. I installed small eyelets (doll-house items), and used a center pumch to flare the back side to form gromments. Here the leather str*p has been glued to the plastic tubing that was glued to the front of the opening. I used contact cement to attach the leather to the model. Here the stitching thread has been installed. The front top combing. Here the stitching has been completed. I drilled through the grommets and threaded the stitching in and out of the holes. Using a thin aluminum tube, I was able to guide the needle back out of the grommets to complete a stitch between the grommets. Up next, the machine guns! Stay tuned The post Nieuport 24 Updates: c*ckpit Details appeared first on Model Airplane News. View the full article
  10. First flown in 1969, the Aérospatiale/BAC Concorde was a British–French turbojet-powered supersonic passenger airliner that was operated until 2003. It had a maximum speed over twice the speed of sound, at Mach 2.04 (1,354 mph at cruise altitude), with seating for 92 to 128 passengers. Concorde entered service in 1976 and continued flying for 27 years. This amazing 30 foot long RC Concorde really redefines the term giant scale and when you consider it’s powered by four turbine engines, you gotta sit up and take notice. Here’s a video of its successful maiden flight. Model data: Scale: 1/6 Span: 13 ft. Lenght: 33 ft. Height: 6.1 ft. Weight: 328.5 pounds Turbine: 4x JetCat P300 Pro Fuel Tanks Capacity: 5.8 Gallons Gears: Pneumatic Radio: PowerBox CORE Receiver: PowerBox PBR-26D Servos: 18x HACKER TD2612S The post Monster Concorde Takes Flight appeared first on Model Airplane News. View the full article
  11. A staple in the hobby industry for over 60 years, DU-BRO Products recently announced that Sales & Marketing Director for past 19 years, Brian Bychowski, has purchased the company. After 19 years of working with and learning from the Broberg family, Bychowski took ownership in December 2019. A view of the main floor History Dewey (Orv) Broberg started the brand of products that modelers have grown to love and depend on. Broberg’s children (Jim, g*yle and Kathy) continued the tradition and grew the hobby brand and two other divisions (DUBRO Fishing and Pine Ridge Archery) to international brands for outdoors enthusiasts with the same craftsmanship as our hobby customers. The newest most, innovative equipment is used In 2001, Brian Bychowski came on to run marketing helping to create the international brand presence of Du-Bro’s three divisions. In addition to his work with Du-Bro, Brian has spearheaded several other companies and has helped them with marketing and sales opportunities. Bychowski and the Broberg family have been working on the sale and transition of the company’s ownership for many years and take pride in knowing the traditions will continue under the new leadership. Jim Broberg will still be helping with future product development and design for continued new and creative products. Quality products and excellent customer service will continue to be the rule. While he remains true to the history and values that the Du-Bro brand was built on, Bychowski looks forward to the continued growth of the company as it explores new and innovative directions. “We need to adjust for changing markets and the needs and wants of our customers,” Bychowski said, “but we also are very aware of the place DU-BRO has in this industry and we will continue to provide the highest quality possible and the customer service and innovation modelers have come to expect. The post Latest News! Du-Bro Products appeared first on Model Airplane News. View the full article
  12. This year, P.J. Ash from Searcy, AR, will be flying in the Pro Prop class with his Douglas TBD Devastator. Built over 20 years ago, the Torped* Bomber is totally scratch built from 3-view drawings (no construction plans). The Devastator has a 100-inch wingspan and about 75 inches in length. The retracts were originally from SpringAir but have been converted to electric drive from Down and Locked. The model has traditional all-wood construction and a glassed finish and P.J. is planning to totally str*p it down, and redoing everything including putting in a new detailed c*ckpit interior with a crew from Warbird Pilots. One, pilot, one navigator, and a tail gunner. The model will be powered by a Zenoah G-62 gas engine using a Falcon propeller, and P.J. is using a DX-18 transmitter and HV6180 Spektrum servos and equipment. Robart retracts are upgraded by Down and Locked. The post Road to Top Gun-TBD Devastator appeared first on Model Airplane News. View the full article
  13. The sh*zuoka Hobby show event (scheduled from May 16 to 17) has been cancelled this year. This due to Japanese government new regulations for big meetings and conventions in order to reduce the Coronavirus impact in the area. Exhibits from countless famed Japanese hobby manufacturers were planned to be on show at this event. The post sh*zuoka Hobby Show Cancelled appeared first on Model Airplane News. View the full article
  14. In the fifth episode of season 6, Matt and Claire discuss what members can expect now that the NPRM Comment Period is almost over. Learn what the AMA will be doing in the meantime and when you can expect to hear results about the comment period. LINKS from the episode: Become a member! – http://www.modelaircraft.org/join The AMA Podcast – http://www.modelaircraft.org/podcast 2020 Nats information – modelaircraft.org/nats AMA Government Advocacy- http://www.modelaircraft.org/gov I Fly AMA Facebook Group – http://www.facebook.com/groups/IFLYAMA March Model Aviation Digital Edition – http://www.modelaviation.com/digital Bing Autoplan Fly By – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nRZ7s… What to expect after the NPRM Comment Period – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YubkP… AMA Membership Cards, A Timeline – https://amablog.modelaircraft.org/ama… Model Aviation Enthusiasts Advocate Against Remote ID – http://amablog.modelaircraft.org/amag… View the full article
  15. For the Flyzone Micro Albatros and the micro Fokker Dr.I Triplane, there’s a little white styrofoam, super lightweight pilot b*st included in the box. But few RC modelers add this little guy because it requires some painting to make him look like a WW1 aviator instead of a snowman! Here’s some tips to make the job quick and easy! A little bit of effort really brings these micro RC WW1 warbirds to life! Here’s what you need: Some foam safe paint, fine tipped brushes, a bit of water, a paper plate and some napkins. 1. To make the job a bit easier, spear the poor aviator with a hobby knife so you can hold and adjust him while you paint. The first color to apply is the skin tone on the face. Use white, red and a dash of brown to get the tone you like. Mix the colors on the paper plate and use a semi broad brush to apply the paint. Neatness doesn’t count here, just slap it on and let dry. 2. Mix up a light brown color (brown and white) and apply to the leather flying helmet areas! You have to be a little more careful now, don’t get any on the face. Let dry and apply a second coat to give a nice even cover. 3. Now add a little black to the brown and add the leather flying j*cket. Be sure not to get any on the shoulder straps which should remain white. Now add some black to the goggle lenses, and a little silver on the shoulder strap buckles and around the goggle frames. With the dark brown add some detail on the leather helmet (seams and the goggle band,) and with some dark dark brown (more black) add some shadow lowlights around the collar and on the sides of the straps. A little dab of silver in the middle of the goggle lenese makes him look like a pilot instead of the Cyclops from the X-Men! A small bit of darker redish flesh tone hints at the lips. Don’t use bright red unless you are painting Amelia Earhart! 4. Add a dab of foam safe glue to the base and glue him into place in the c*ckpit! Job’s done and you’re ready to look for that dastardly Snoopy in his Sopwith Doghouse! Go get ’em Baron! The post Tips for Painting Micro Pilot Figures appeared first on Model Airplane News. View the full article
  16. Here’s a sneak peek of one of the coolest aircraft headed to Top Gun 2020. Henry Castellanos from Fort Lauderdale, Florida, Henry be flying in the Team Scale class with builder Alberto Enriquez’s impressive Boeing 787 jet liner. Built from an AeroModeler kit, the jet liner (the only turbine powered 787 in the world), has a 147.56 inch wingspan, weighs 76 pounds and is powered by twin JetCentral Lynx 130 turbine engines. The jet liner is also equipped with a PowerBox Core radio system PowerBox Core/Royal for power distribution and twin PowerBox Core 26D receivers. It features custom scale electric retractable gear and navigation lights, fully operational flight and ground spoilers and six fl*ps. 24 servos in total are used in the airplane. The model took 4 months working full time 8 hours per day to complete. The yet to be finished airliner will be painted with PPG base coat clear coat in New United Airlines livery using paint codes from Boeing. A sponsored PowerBox America team pilot , Henry has been flying jets for 19 years and has been involved in the RC hobby for over 29 years. This will be Henry’s third time competing at Top Gun. Last year he placed 2nd Place in X-Class and 2nd place in Pro Sport Jet and won best Jet at Top Gun 2019. Video of the test flight courtesy of The post World’s Largest RC Boeing 787 appeared first on Model Airplane News. View the full article
  17. As my current scale building project continues, I am now starting to build the Nieuport 24’s engine cowling. I barrowed my good friend John Tanzer’s technique of apply glass cloth to a foam plug and then pulling a nylon stocking over it to hold the cloth tight against the plug. The resin will then be applied and allowed to flow into the cloth. I got most of my materials from Home Depot. The fiberglass shown here is labeled heavy duty, but I would guess it is 2oz. cloth. I made a test of three layers with resin pressed between two sheets of acrylic and the cured sample was 0.020 inches thick. So I am ordering some 6oz. cloth as well. I used 1-inch-thick pink foam insulation board and carefully cut five 12×12 inch squares from two 24×24 inch boards using a sharp utility knife. Next, I carefully marked each square’s center of each square. A sharpened piece of K&S Brass tubing makes a great foam hole cutter. I used 1/2 inch diameter tubing to match the hardwood dowel I will used as the mandrel for shaping the foam. Using plenty of spray adhesive (letting each surface dry before joining), I glued the foam squares together and weighed it down with led shot weights. The dowel is used as a guide to position each layer of foam. Here I am checking the alignment of the dowel with the surfaces of the foam block. Here I am adding rough cut marks onto the top of the foam block for cutting with my band saw. I ran the foam through the band saw before gluing the dowel mandrel into place. If I had a larger band saw table, I would have made a jig board so I could use the center dowel as a pivot to cut the foam into a circle. Here the foam has been cut slightly larger than the required 11 inch diameter. Make sure to check that the saw blade is square to the table. Use a slow cutting rate, and let the saw do all the work. I scr*wed a smooth plywood base plate to my drill press table and drilled a 1/2 inch guide hole that will accept the bottom of the dowel. I used 5-minute epoxy to glue the dowel in place in the foam. Take care to make sure everything is aligned and square to minimize any wobble when the foam is spinning. I also spot glued a couple of plywood end plates to the foam to spread the torque force while spinning the foam with the drill press. The bottom plate just rests on the plywood base plate scr*wed to the drill press table. Test run the drill press to make sure you have the base plate properly aligned with the drill chuck. To get the shape right, I printed out my plan’s engine cowling side view and glued it to some poster paper. Using 80 grit sandpaper, I slowly rounded the foam to the final diameter and then rounded the top corner. It does not take a lot of pressure to shape the pink foam. Here you see I am almost there. I just kept sanding off the points that touched the template until the entire foam plug matched. After only about 15 minutes effort, the foam plug was finished. I used 50 grit sand paper to smooth the foam surface as shown. Here I removed the top end plate and marked off the approximate cowling opening. The next step will be covering the foam with clear food wrap and start applying the fiberglass cloth. Stay tuned! The post DIY Fiberglass Engine Cowl Part 1. appeared first on Model Airplane News. View the full article
  18. As many of you may know, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is proposing a new set of rules that will greatly impact the hobby we all love. The FAA’s recent Notice of Proposed Rule Making for Remote Identification will affect where we can fly RC, how we can fly RC, how RC aircraft will be produced, and a myriad of other implications that have the potential of negatively impacting our hobby. The deadline is fast approaching and we have only until March 2nd to let the FAA know our concerns and ideas for finding a workable solution for Remote ID. The m*thod to comment is easy. As a model aviation enthusiast, you are uniquely qualified to provide valuable input concerning our RC hobby and industry. We recommend that you submit your own personal comment, rather than simply cut and past from other sources. The link below will take you to the FAA comment input page. There are also links with helpful PDFs for crafting a persuasive comment. Do it today! And ask your flying buddies to do the same. https://www.regulations.gov/comment?D=FAA-2019-1100-0001 The post MODEL AIRPLANE NEWS CALL TO ACTION! appeared first on Model Airplane News. View the full article
  19. Rarely seen in RC form, this amazing 1/6-scale RC Lockheed Super Constellation Airliner is wearing the colors of the TWA “Star of America”. Owned and built by Keith Mitchell, this four-engine behemoth took 5 years build including design and construction. Its initial flights were taken under the Large Model Association regulations (CAA approved ) for model aircraft weighing more than 176.3 pounds. It underwent 12 test flights for combined flight time of more than 2 hours to get it is now LMA\CAA certificate to fly at public shows. The amazing scheme was applied by the master, Philip Noel of Pinnacle Aviation. The Super Connie has a wingspan: 21 feet and a Length of 19 Feet. Weighing in at 220 pounds, it is powered by four ZDZ 90cc gas engines turning 28×10 Biela Carbon fiber propellers. Radio gear is a Futaba 14-Channel system controlling 22 servos: (13 for ailerons, elevator, rudder, fl*ps, 4 for throttle, and 5 for landing gear and lights). The video was filmed at the LMA Cosford Show by Dom Mitchell. Video courtesy of ‘Essential RC’. The post Colossal TWA Super Connie Airliner appeared first on Model Airplane News. View the full article
  20. The Red Bull RC Aerobatic Team performs a great show at the Lodrino Air Meet in Switzerland, flying their 106-inch-span Pitts Model-12 “Beast” biplanes. Each of the multi-wing aerobats is powered by a 3W 220cc four-cylinder engine. Thanks to Horst Zeller from RC Scale Airplanes for taking and posting this great video. The post Red Bull RC Aerobatic Team appeared first on Model Airplane News. View the full article
  21. MORE EPISODES >> View the full article
  22. In the fourth episode of season 6, Matt and Claire talk about Top Gear’s James May’s ties to model aviation, a couple of stand-out youth members who have been active in the I Fly AMA Facebook group, and how you can participate in the Nats compet*tion for free! #IFLYAMA LINKS: James May’s Toy Stories – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y19b0… Become a member! – http://www.modelaircraft.org/join The AMA Podcast – http://www.modelaircraft.org/podcast AMA Government Advocacy – http://www.modelaircraft.org/gov Government Advocacy Coalition – http://www.modelaircraft.org/govcoali… I Fly AMA Facebook Group – http://www.facebook.com/groups/IFLYAMA View the full article
  23. Here’s a video of editor Gerry Yarrish’s 1/4-scale Fokker Dr. I Triplane on its last flight. Gerry had setup a remote video camera in the c*ckpit so he could film a dogfight between him and his flying buddy Sal Calvagna. The flight took place at the Central Connecticut Big Biplane Bash 11 years ago. In the video you can just see Sal’s aircraft just before Gerry’s Triplane heads for the ground. Built from a Balsa USA kit, Gerry’s triplane was powered by a Zenoah G-26. And up until this last flight, Gerry had flown his WW I German fighter for more than 6 years without incident! The reason, the triplane planted itself in the corn field was because the battery voltage dropped way down and the failsafe setting pulled the engine to idle with neutralized control surfaces… Ok Well! The post Last Flight of my Triplane appeared first on Model Airplane News. View the full article
  24. Pedro Sanchez is a master scale modeler and a member of the Georgia Model Aviators in Ballground. He has many large scale models in his hanger and prides himself with absolute detail on his models. His latest, as seen here, is a Balsa USA Stearman. Pedro is relentless when it comes to detail and realism. He spends hours looking at pictures and full size airplanes so he can impart that detail on his model. Along with this he has developed the skills to make things not usually seen on models that are on a full size airplane. Some of the details are very difficult to replicate, especially with the materials available. Pedro is quick to point this out when showing off his models. A couple of the most difficult things to do on the Stearman, according to Pedro, were modifying the ailerons and mounting the engine behind the firewall. The ailerons, as shown on the plans, were not scale and had to be reconfigured. Even the hinging had to be redesigned to accommodate this change. To maintain the scale look the engine had to be mounted behind the firewall, bringing the cylinder heads closer to it. This presented all kinds of problems with the exhaust collector ring and engine mounting. The 30% Balsa USA Stearman is a very large biplane with a top wing spanning 116 inches. The flying weight, depending on how you build it, is from 40 -50 lbs. Pedro’s came out at 55 pounds ready to fly. His Stearman is covered with Stitts cloth and painted with automotive paint and features rib stitching along with many other scale detail and features. The unusual scale paint and trim was taken from a Stearman based in the UK. The kit is a real box of sticks, like most Balsa USA kits, and is quite expensive. Pedro spent 3 months building the Stearman, usually nights and weekends, and when he had extra time. — TEXT AND PHOTOS BY JERRY SMITH The post Giant Stunning Stearman appeared first on Model Airplane News. View the full article
  25. Dared myself, Trainer 60 wing 60" sort of like a big stick so 57" body, apprentice tail. Made one circle (lap) landed on wheels. Was not pretty but will try with a bigger prop. If still work rough will put a bigger tail feather set.
  1. Load more activity
×
×
  • Create New...