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  1. Matt and Claire are streaming live a day early on this episode of AMA Air on Friday, July 31, at 2 p.m. EDT. Click here to go to YouTube and set a reminder to watch live! This episode will feature details about the first annual National Fun Fly event, an announcement about our new Club of the Month program, and a special reveal of our new slogan! All that and more on this episode of AMA Air. LINKS from the episode: https://www.modelaircraft.org/community https://www.modelaircraft.org/clubs https://www.modelaviationday.com https://www.modelaircraft.org/executive-council https://www.facebook.com/groups/iflyama https://www.modelaircraft.org/join Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/modelaviation Join our Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/iflyama Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/amamodelaviation Read the latest digital edition of Model Aviation magazine: https://www.modelaviation.com/digital Visit the National Model Aviation Museum online: https://www.nationalmodelaviationmuseum.org Keep up to date with FAA and AMA Government Advocacy News: https://www.modelaircraft.org/gov Help support the preservation and advocacy of the hobby: https://www.modelaircraft.org/donate Learn more about the AMA: https://www.modelaircraft.org/about-ama Become a member: https://www.modelaircraft.org/join #iflyama #airathome #amaair #airatwork View the full article
  2. There no doubt about it, the ground pounding, tank killing A-10 Warthog is an amazing warbird. When it comes to giant scale RC jets, the A-10 delivers the same kind of excitement. This video from RCScaleAirplanes, highlights that amazing MiBo Warthog flown by Kurt Tötsch as he performed a fantastic flight demo at the Barone Rosso Airshow. The all composite MiBo A-10 Thunderbolt II /Warthog is 1/5.8-scale, has a wingspan of 118 inches and weighs in at 54.9 pounds. It is loaded with interior and exterior details and is powered by two FT 180 turbine engines. Kurt’s A-10 includes optional gun and Flares features. The post Wonderful A-10 Warthog appeared first on Model Airplane News. View the full article
  3. Almost every RC enthusiast has built scale models of their favorite planes, but Canadian Ian Baron takes his modeling to a new level! So far, he has made four replicas of different types of planes used during world wars, all made from recycled bits and parts. Baron manages to create such huge replicas by measuring the parts of the planes of a 1:48 scale model plane. The inspiration to make these replicas dawned upon Ian five years back when he visited Ford Automotive Museum in Michigan and he realized that there is a huge potential to go creative by learning the art of welding metal. Ian had already tried his hands on making dune buggies and had restored Model A Fords, and so making planes was a natural choice. After collecting a lot of materials from various households, Ian was all geared up to make planes except that he lacked metal sheets for making skin of the replicas. For that, Ian scavenged scr*pyards, and auto and home depots and arranged enough metal sheets to make grand replicas. This terrific video of Ian and his masterpieces will make your day. The post Giant Scale or Replicas? appeared first on Model Airplane News. View the full article
  4. With the ever popular use of electric power systems, nitro-burning glow engines have started to before less understood by newcomers to the hobby. Once the mainstay of the hobby, 2-str*ke glow engines still have a lot to offer and produce excellent power for their weight. Once you’ve decided to give a glow powered airplane a try, ask for help and always break in your engine before your first flight. Here are three of the most asked question about glow power. WHY DOES THE GLOW PLUG CONTINUE TO WORK AFTER PULLING OFF THE STARTER BATTERY? When hooked up to a battery, the glow plug’s coiled-wire element glows bright orange, which creates a temperature in excess of 1,500 degrees F. Once the engine is flipped over, either by hand or a starter, the compressed fuel/air mixture will ignite. If the mixture is right, the engine will become self-sustaining so that when the battery is disconnected, the engine continues to run. Simply put, what happens inside the comb*stion chamber is that the coiled-wires are heated up from the compression str*ke and continue to glow for the next compression str*ke, igniting the fuel/air mixture, which in turn, heats up the wire for the next cycle. HOW DOES AN IDLE BAR HELP THE IDLE? The idle bar is there to keep the glow plug from getting extinguished when the engine is throttled up. When the engine is idling, it has a tendency to pool up some fuel in the crankcase so when the engine is throttled up, that puddle is forced through the cylinder transfer ports. These ports direct the flow right at the glow plug. With an unshielded glow plug, that fuel hits the wire element and instantly smothers it. The idle bar in front of that wire element helps prevent the flow of fuel from hitting the wire and thereby keeps the glow plug lit. If you have a problem with the engine choking out when you go to wide open throttle, you may want to try a glow plug with an idle bar. WHY ARE THERE DIFFERENT GLOW PLUG TEMPERATURE RATINGS? We have different plug temperature ratings so they can be used to change the performance of the engine depending on the flying conditions. Because our engines have a fixed compression str*ke and operating setup, the perfect ignition point will change with different running conditions. Some of these can include compression ratio, nitro or oil contents in the fuel, weather conditions and propeller load. By using plugs with different temperature ratings, we can adjust the ignition point so it’s not too early or too late. Once you find that sweet spot, your engine will produce the best performance. The post Glow Plugs Explained appeared first on Model Airplane News. View the full article
  5. Recently, I found out that home repair stores like Home Depot stock in their hardware section Rare-Earth magnets ideal for use as engine cowling attachment devices. They come in all sorts of sizes and types and for my ongoing workshop build-along for the Sopwith Camel, I used 1/4 inch and .47 inch diameter x 1/8 inch thick magnets. And, the best part, there are very cheap to buy, often less than $4 for a package of six or eight depending on size. The fiberglass engine cowl shown in this post comes from Fiberglass Specialties. So the first step was to make some lite ply retainer plates the magnets would fit in. I laser cut these 1×1 inch squares with the proper size holes cut in the center. The magnets are a snug fit in the holes and so a few drops of thin ZAP CA glue is all that’s needed to hold the magnets in place. They sit flush on both sides of the plates. Next use 5-minute epoxy and glue the magnetic retainer plates around the cowl ring on the fuselage as shown. Tape holds the plates in position until the epoxy has set. I placed the matching cowling retainer plates on top of the fuselage magnets and then made a plywood ring that’s a snug fit inside the cowling. I pushed the cowling and cowl ring into position with the double stack of magnetic retainers setting the proper gap distance. I then used some thick ZAP CA to tack glue the cowl ring inside the cowling. Below you can see the plywood ring tack glued in place within the fiberglass cowling. Notice the cutout area to clear the engine’s carburetor. Here you see the completed installation of the plywood cowl ring. I first CA glued in several sections of fiberglass take (2 oz. weight), and then I built up a fillet using a mixture of 15 minute Pacer Z-poxy and micro-balloons. THis thick mixture is trowelled into place with a mixing stick and smoothed into place before the mixture set up. I then applied 5 minute epoxy to the second row of magnets on the fuselage and quickly pressed the cowl and cowl plate into position using an index mark to make sure everything was lined up properly. I used tape to hold the cowl in place until the epoxy cured. About 20 minutes later, the epoxy had set long enough to all the cowling to be removed as can be seen below. I applied more 5-minute epoxy around the edges of the square plates to fill any gaps between them and the cowl ring. I also cleaned off any access epoxy from the face of the magnets with some solvent. That’s it, the strength of the .47 inch magnets is more than strong enough to hold the cowl in place even with the engine running at full power. All that’s now left is to clean off the engine cowl, paint it and finish off the rest of the Camel’s build. Give rare earth magnets a try. They are a great way to hold model parts together and eliminate those u*ly scr*w heads in your next scale project. As a side note, I also use size 1/4 inch x 1/8 inch thick magnets to hold the main hatch cover (canopy and machine gun h*mp), in place. The post Magnetic Engine Cowl Attachment appeared first on Model Airplane News. View the full article
  6. Built from Vailly Aviation plans, this giant scale 1/5-scale Hawker Tempest V has a 98-inch wingspan and weighs in at 43 pounds. Power is provided by a Desert Aircraft 85cc engine spinning a Menz 26×10 prop. Builder and pilot Andy Wynn notes that the warbird also sports homemade retracts and exhaust stacks from Fighter Aces. Thanks to Dean and Pete Coxon for sharing this great video from the Willis Warbird Meet! The post Terrific Tempest appeared first on Model Airplane News. View the full article
  7. Matt and Claire are streaming live on this episode of AMA Air on Wednesday, July 15th, at 2 p.m. EDT. This episode will feature details about the 2020 National Model Aeromodeling Championships, The Weak Signals Toledo R/C Show, and an important announcement about the 2020 MultiGP International Open! LINKS from the episode: https://www.multigp.io https://www.amaflightschool.org/campama https://www.modelaviation.com/live https://www.modelaircraft.org/nats https://www.facebook.com/groups/iflyama https://www.modelaircraft.org/sweepstakes https://www.modelaircraft.org/join Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/modelaviation Join our Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/iflyama Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/amamodelaviation Read the latest digital edition of Model Aviation magazine: https://www.modelaviation.com/digital Visit the National Model Aviation Museum online: https://www.nationalmodelaviationmuseum.org Keep up to date with FAA and AMA Government Advocacy News: https://www.modelaircraft.org/gov Help support the preservation and advocacy of the hobby: https://www.modelaircraft.org/donate Learn more about the AMA: https://www.modelaircraft.org/about-ama Become a member: https://www.modelaircraft.org/join #iflyama #airathome #amaair #airatwork View the full article
  8. So my Fokker Triplane had been finished for a while and tI flew the airplane several times without any problems. But there is that big issue of an empty c*ckpit. So, I converted my old Mini-Me 1/3 scale pilot figure into a WW1 leather helmet and goggles guy with a great set of cloths including a great leather j*cket and some black trousers. With a proper Triplane driver, I still needed to make the guy a good looking (and removable) pilot seat. Where to start? Go to a dollar store and look for some woven straw place mats or a cheap straw hat with a wide brim. Cut out a horseshoe shape from some foam poster board and size it for your pilot’s b*tt. Roll the woven straw material around the poster board and mark for your cut lines. Cut out the material and use some ZAP Goo adhesive and and let dry with some weights added until dry. Cut out some more of the material and glue it to the seat top. For seatbelts I cut some slots in the seat and glue in some Velcro straps. This way the pilot can be secured in place without gluing him in place. To secure the seat in the fuselage I used a spruce crosspiece and a couple hardwood blocks and scr*ws at each side of the c*ckpit The seat does a great job hiding the radio gear and puts the pilot figure at the proper height so he looks correct during flight. In the back where the seat contacts the aft former, I used some stick-on magnets to make a firm but easy to remove connection. My new Mini-Me looks the part of a WW1 Triplane pilot. His seat is also accurate for that era of aviation. The clothing I used came from Wendy at www.perfect-pilots.co.uk . Strapped in, The seat is now glued to the crosspiece. When dry remove the scr*ws and the seat is easy to remove for access to the radio. Add a couple of scale Spandau machine guns and we’re good to go! Anybody see where Snoopy went with his Sopwith Doghouse?! The post Easy Scale Details — Vintage Pilot Seat appeared first on Model Airplane News. View the full article
  9. AMAZING VTOL ENGINEERING! With amazing vertical takeoff and landing performance, Norbert Schurz demonstrates his scratch built RC Osprey at a VTOL compet*tion in Germany. His spectacular model is powered by only a single electric motor. There are no flight surfaces! All control is maintained through the movement of the two propellers/rotors. In this first flight at the event you can see that Norbert was tentative with the control of his V-22 Osprey and demonstrated it’s hovering and agility. Video filmed for the ‘Essential RC’ YouTube channel by Joel Vlashof. Don’t forget to subscribe to ‘Essential RC’ http://www.youtube.com/c/EssentialRC? The Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey is an American multi-mission, tilt-rotor military aircraft with both vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL), and short takeoff and landing (STOL) capabilities. It is designed to combine the functionality of a conventional helicopter with the long-range, high-speed cruise performance of a turboprop aircraft. The post Giant Scale RC SCALE RC V-22 OSPREY appeared first on Model Airplane News. View the full article
  10. A One of a kind Ziroli TBM Story. Back in the early 2000s, Nick Ziroli Jr. wanted to design som*thing extra special to compete with at Frank Tiano’s Top Gun Scale Invitational event. Since he hailed from Long Island, the famous Grumman TBM Avenger torped*/bomber seemed most appropriate. Nick Jr. designed and drew all the working plans for the 1/6-scale TBM model. He went on to build all the plugs and develop molds to produce the fiberglass fuselage and engine cowling, and he vacuum-formed the clear plastic canopy and gun turret. Nick Jr. then tackled the very daunting job of designing and machining the functional folding-wing mechanism. Nick Sr.’s longtime friend Bob Walker of Robart Manufacturing agreed to build the scale retractable landing gear and also helped Nick work out the design of the wing hinge locks. The finished Avenger was a sight to behold. Powered by a Precision Eagle 4.2ci gas engine, the TBM was all done up in the U.S. Navy colors of future President George H.W. Bush. The Avenger impressed everyone with its torped* drop demo flights. The only real issue with the new model was that the folding wing mechanism gave the aircraft a very high wing loading, and it was subsequently damaged during one of the flights at Top Gun. Undaunted, Nick returned to the workshop, removed the folding wing mechanism, and switched to lighter plug-in outer wing panels. The second time around Nick refinished his Avenger in the colors of the British Tarpon I. All went extremely well, or so it seemed, until the model experienced radio failure shortly after takeoff for the halftime show. The model climbed out at a high angle, tip-stalled, and came down hard, seriously damaging the airframe. Nick Jr. had no intentions of completing the Avenger plans or offering them (or molded parts) for sale, but close friend Tony Kirchenko of Setauket, New York really wanted to build one. So Nick Jr. sent the damaged landing gear back to Robart for repair while he and Tony laid up another fuselage from the mold. They cut foam cores for the outer wing panels, and some months later, a new Grumman TBM, powered with a Quadra 75cc gas engine, rolled onto the Skyhawks’ flightline. Tony’s new TBM featured a fully detailed c*ckpit interior, a droppable torped* from its internal bomb/torped* bay, and a retractable tail hook. Tony’s Avenger was just as impressive as the original. After owning it for several years, Tony decided it needed a new home as it was just too big was always c*mbersome for Tony to move around. Enter Jim McQueen of Wading River, New York. When Jim heard that Tony’s TBM was for sale, he jumped at the opportunity. You see, this was not only a Ziroli-designed TBM, it was the only flying Ziroli Avenger flying in the entire world! There are no others. You can’t build one, because there aren’t any plans available. And you can’t buy one, unless you make a deal with Jim, and I don’t think he intends to let go of this one any time soon. But, if you really want to build your very own 1/6-scale TBM Avenger, give Nick a call (631) 467-4765, or visit their website: ZiroliGiantScalePlans.com. Nick bought the rights to the Charlie Kellogg TBM design and he offers plans and parts for it, so you can build your very own. Full-size American Airpower Museum’s Avenger piloted by Nick Jr. BY SAL CALVAGNA | PHOTOS BY SAL CALVAGNA & RICH URAVITCH The post Ziroli Avenger History appeared first on Model Airplane News. View the full article
  11. After several years of RC modeling use, the compact laser cutter from Full Spectrum Laser, is still going strong and has been almost completely maintenance free. If you’ve ever wanted to get a laser cutter for your workshop, check out this product review. This easy to use unit is designed especially for hobbyists and small home businesses wanting production quality results. The 5th Gen Hobby Laser Cutter has a 20×12 inch work area and has a glass water-cooled laser tube rated at 40 watts. It is ideal for most RC model builder projects and it has several features that are normally found on more expensive units. The table-top 5th Gen 20×12 Hobby Laser Cutter & Engaver is the perfect choice for any serious RC model builder. The laser light is invisible so a beam splitter superimposes a red LED marker over the laser, so it can be positioned on the workpiece. Quality CNC manufactured parts and optics The 40Watt Hobby Laser is very easy to run and you can control it with any PC or laptop. The driver program that controls the laser allows you to “print” you designs directly to the laser using any program that allows printing. That includes CorelDraw, AutoCAD, (or any other CAD program), PhotoShop and even MS Word! This job was done using Microsoft Word as the program. Precise and easy to use, the Hobby Laser makes short work of all hobby related materials from Balsa and Lite Ply to birch plywood, fiberglass sheet (G-10) and even cast acrylic material. From cutting model parts to engraving RC event trophies, this 40 watt laser cutter and engraver is perfect for any RC modeler’s workshop. Precision parts cut from all popular RC building materials. The best thing about this laser cutter is that it is industrial grade and it is manufactured in the USA so there is no problem with service and replacement parts. It is ideal for the serious RC modeler and it is a great first step to starting a home business. Besides laser cutting model parts, you can also engrave trophies, (both wood and acrylic) and it has many accessories to do top shelf laser work like rotary etching on bottles, glasses or other cylindrical parts. This is the original drawing scan loaded into the laser driver program. It appears in the window and the pink section shows what has already been engraved. The finished engraving enhanced with water colors applied by hand and brush. One of several awards made for the Old Rhinbeck Aerodrome Annual RC Jamboree. The plaque is made of Alder wood. Impressive cast acrylic awards engraved in mirror image on the back to show through to the front of the award. When it comes to building models, what ever you can draw with CAD, can be cut exactly to size. Identical parts can easily cut and can be positioned to minimize waste material. Any wood can be engraved, this one is a laminated cutting board intended as a wedding gift. 5 tips for great laser cutting 1. Read all the instructions that come with the laser cutter. You do not want to learn as you go. You can damage the machine if you run the gantry out of the work area. If you can’t figure som*thing out, contact customer service. 2. Never disable any safety features and always wear safety glasses intended for laser use. Make sure all cooling systems are working properly to avoid damaging the laser tube. 3. Make test cuts and keep an operation logbook so you can determine the proper settings and speeds for various materials. This also will give you a baseline so you can judge the performance over time of the laser cutter. 4. Always use the fastest speed and the lowest laser power settings needed to complete the job. All jobs should be completed with one pass. If you use more than one pass, the edges will get over heated and reduce the quality of the cut or engraving. 5. Never cut metal parts or PVC plastic. Metal will reflect the laser and can damage the optics. PVC material produces a corrosive vapor when laser cut, this can damage the optics as well as precision CNC manufactured parts in the laser cutter. Most instruction manuals will show acceptable and unacceptable materials to use. The post Pro Tips for Laser Cutting — with Video appeared first on Model Airplane News. View the full article
  12. July 2, 2020. The Triple Tree Aerodrome and our Board of Directors have been closely monitoring the developing COVID-19 global pandemic. The number of cases has continually increased, and our great State of South Carolina is no exception. When you attend any of our events, you become part of our family. Families take care of each other and their well-being. In the interest of safety for our family, it brings me great sadness to announce that we will be canceling our Fall 2020 series of events, the Triple Tree Fly-In, Nall in the Fall, and the Heli Extravaganza. We look forward to the day when we can greet you at the iconic gates of The Triple Tree Aerodrome or look for you on short final to Runway 3/21. Until then, stay safe and look out for each other. Please visit our website, www.tta.aero, or approved social media outlets for the latest updates. Regards, Executive Director, Robb Williams, 330 Mary Hanna Rd., Woodruff, SC 29388 Triple Tree Aerodrome · 330 Mary Hanna Rd · Woodruff, SC 29388 · USA The post Triple Tree Aerodrome Fall 2020 Event Update appeared first on Model Airplane News. View the full article
  13. Matt and Ashley, who is temporarily filling in for Claire, talk about AMA Jr. Camp, a new virtual Camp AMA experience, an overview of how the AMA Gov team has been advocating on your behalf for the last few years, and some heartwarming stories submitted to us through our various social media channels. LINKS from the episode: https://www.amaflightschool.org/campama https://www.modelaircraft.org/gov https://www.facebook.com/groups/iflyama https://www.instagram.com/amamodelaviation https://www.modelaircraft.org/join Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/modelaviation Join our Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/iflyama Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/amamodelaviation Read the latest digital edition of Model Aviation magazine: https://www.modelaviation.com/digital Visit the National Model Aviation Museum online: https://www.nationalmodelaviationmuseum.org Keep up to date with FAA and AMA Government Advocacy News: https://www.modelaircraft.org/gov Help support the preservation and advocacy of the hobby: https://www.modelaircraft.org/donate Learn more about the AMA: https://www.modelaircraft.org/about-ama Become a member: https://www.modelaircraft.org/join #iflyama #airathome #amaair #airatwork View the full article
  14. Hot off the shipping boat, Legend Hobby, (formerly VQ Wabirds,) has introduced this amazing new P-47 Razorback! This almost ready to fly classic WW II warbird is one of the best you’ll see at any flying field or fly in. And it comes with loads of details! Specs. Wingspan: 81.0 in. Wing Area:1200.3 sq. in. Weight: 22 lbs. Length: 67.6 in. Engine/Motor size: Zenoah G-62 Servo: 9-channels 13 servos All Spektrum/Flown with DX-18 (as t*sted) Retracts are all electric with fully functioning gear doors. Both tail gear doors and inner main gear doors. According to MAN contributor and test pilot P.J. Ash, “This is one of the best flying versions of the P-47 I have ever flown. The cowl is large enough for any engine with little to protrude outside. All controls are hinged with one large pin and are all pre-installed at the factory”. Very scale indeed. We’re working on a fully detailed Flight Report and review so stay tuned. Check it out CLICK HERE: The post Legend Hobby’s Amazing P-47 Thunderbolt! appeared first on Model Airplane News. View the full article
  15. To all our dedicated Jamboree event participants and followers. This has to be one of the hardest letters I have had to write as the CD of the Jamboree event. The Covid-19, 2020 pandemic have t*sted the world in ways that no one could have thought possible just a few short months ago. While the Covid-19 virus seems to have dropped from major news it is still very much with us as we start to open up the US economy to a new normal. In New York State, the ORA Airshows and Jamboree event will fall under the phase 4 opening because these events draw people not only from long distances within the US but from around the world. As of this writing many other large RC events are still being cancelled due the Covid-19 and how the rules for opening are applied to individual events. As the Mid-Hudson Radio Control Society (MHRCS) pours over all the rules and requirements for cleaning, distancing/separation of front-line workers and social distancing, it becomes a monumental task to make sure we can run a safe and enjoyable event as MHRCS has in the past. As planner for an event the size of the Jamboree, there is 2 trains of thought. One is that people are very much looking to get out of the house and back to normal life. The second is the virus is still very much present and people will remain apprehensive to venture out of their home other than for essentials like food etc. At this point there is no way to estimate attendance and registration numbers for this years contest. After reviewing the open NY state regulations and all its largely undefined rules and hearing about litigation concerns for very large events like the Dutchess County Fairgrounds, MHRCS has considered the risks vs. rewards and has concluded that the risks of holding the Jamboree event far outweigh the benefits. Holding the Jamboree and maintaining a high level of safety for all our patrons was at the top of the list and we have therefore decided to cancel the 2020 Jamboree. MHRCS is dedicated to providing the RC community with a world class Jamboree event and hope you understand our very difficult decision to cancel the Jamboree this year. All of us at MHRCS hope the RC community stays safe, healthy and very much look forward to hosting the Jamboree event in 2021. Mid Hudson RC Society Warren Batson, Jamboree CD The post WW I RC Jamboree Canceled appeared first on Model Airplane News. View the full article
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